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The Breastfeeding Support Thread

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  • The Breastfeeding Support Thread

    I noticed quite a few of our newer members are going to embark on a breastfeeding journey soon, and we didn't have anyplace special for their questions and concerns! Until now
    I'm 9 months into my journey and showing no signs of slowing down, and I'd like to share my knowledge and support with you, and get the same from more veteran nursing moms.
    <center><i>Nature gives us shapeless shapes,<br>Clouds and waves and flame,<br>But human expectation is that love remains the same,<br>And when it doesnít, we point our fingers and blame.</i><br><a href="http://www.womens-health.com/boards/register.php">Register</a>|<a href="http://www.womens-health.com/boards/members/little.html">Contact Admin</a>|<a href="mailto:support*womens-health.com?subject=Forum Contact">Email Admin</a></center>

  • #2
    So, I'll start it off with my own question:
    My son is 9 months old and I'd like to encourage him to wean off his early night feedings. If I could have just 6 hours of baby-free sleep, I'd be happy! He has a bedtime routine and sleeps until his first waking, when he comes into the family bed for snuggles. This can vary from just an hour later or 4-5 hours later.
    Anybody got any ideas on how to get that 6 hours? He's a bit young for Dr. Jay Gordon's technique. I tank him up before bed, and starting today I'm initiating more daytime feedings.
    <center><i>Nature gives us shapeless shapes,<br>Clouds and waves and flame,<br>But human expectation is that love remains the same,<br>And when it doesnít, we point our fingers and blame.</i><br><a href="http://www.womens-health.com/boards/register.php">Register</a>|<a href="http://www.womens-health.com/boards/members/little.html">Contact Admin</a>|<a href="mailto:support*womens-health.com?subject=Forum Contact">Email Admin</a></center>

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    • #3
      At nine months, hopefully you've begun to initiate supplementing with cereal (rice cereal is a good start). Give him some cereal before bed along with his usual nursing. He will probably sleep longer. Also, get a copy of Nursing Your Baby by Karen Pryor and her daughter. It's a fabulous reference. It helped me understand the various stages babies go through. At nine months, your little guy is probably going through a growth spurt - that means he's going to nurse much more often, so supplementing with solids, some cereal, vegies and fruit will help fill him up and progress toward eating solids. Meanwhile, your milk is still the best nutrition. You're doing great!

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      • #4
        Originally posted by Little View Post
        So, I'll start it off with my own question:
        My son is 9 months old and I'd like to encourage him to wean off his early night feedings. If I could have just 6 hours of baby-free sleep, I'd be happy! He has a bedtime routine and sleeps until his first waking, when he comes into the family bed for snuggles. This can vary from just an hour later or 4-5 hours later.
        Anybody got any ideas on how to get that 6 hours? He's a bit young for Dr. Jay Gordon's technique. I tank him up before bed, and starting today I'm initiating more daytime feedings.
        Hi,
        Great doing extra feed's in the day, he will soon start to want to sleep longer.
        Fluids as well like cool boiled water, baby juice if required added. Will help as well.
        Playing soothing music from baby mobile's or light projector, toys on the side of the cot mirror's will interest him so he may stop crying so get's more sleep.
        Well done for breastfeeding for 9 months what an amazing achievement, will have really helped him and yourself. Some mum's do use a top up milk via cup feeding method, if milk supply is not always as productive can help.
        Cup feeding great as no bottle/teat used so does not interfere with normal sucking for breast feeding.
        I am sure you are aware certain foods transmit though breastfeeding and make colic more likely in the infant.
        A really late night feed hopefully at 2400 hrs can if possible often take you though to 0600 hrs, please do let us know how your experience goes.
        I hope can get more rest as I know from working with many mother's breastfeeding exhausting.
        Please take care of yourself so you have a good nights sleep as well.
        Take care, wonderful sections on the forum thanks.
        Kate
        Last edited by Mayflower7; 12-01-2012, 01:03 PM. Reason: Added in language

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        • #5
          This thread is a little old, my son will be turning two in a few days. Still nursing like a boss. Nursing as I type this.

          He actually didn't start sleeping through the night until a few weeks ago when my schedule changed and I started going to bed earlier and getting up MUCH earlier, and on a more consistent schedule. Feeding solid foods didn't help. Giving milk or juice didn't help. Reading at bedtime didn't help, music didn't help. Putting Daddy in charge of bedtime didn't help. Making him sleep in his own bed didn't help, keeping him in our bed didn't help ... nothing helped other than rearranging hours (and probably expectations with them) and waiting until he was good and ready to sleep for an 8-hour stretch.
          <center><i>Nature gives us shapeless shapes,<br>Clouds and waves and flame,<br>But human expectation is that love remains the same,<br>And when it doesnít, we point our fingers and blame.</i><br><a href="http://www.womens-health.com/boards/register.php">Register</a>|<a href="http://www.womens-health.com/boards/members/little.html">Contact Admin</a>|<a href="mailto:support*womens-health.com?subject=Forum Contact">Email Admin</a></center>

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          • #6
            Originally posted by Little View Post
            This thread is a little old, my son will be turning two in a few days. Still nursing like a boss. Nursing as I type this.

            He actually didn't start sleeping through the night until a few weeks ago when my schedule changed and I started going to bed earlier and getting up MUCH earlier, and on a more consistent schedule. Feeding solid foods didn't help. Giving milk or juice didn't help. Reading at bedtime didn't help, music didn't help. Putting Daddy in charge of bedtime didn't help. Making him sleep in his own bed didn't help, keeping him in our bed didn't help ... nothing helped other than rearranging hours (and probably expectations with them) and waiting until he was good and ready to sleep for an 8-hour stretch.
            Hi,
            Well done for feeding for two years, amazing. So glad you're getting more sleep.
            Take Care
            Kate

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            • #7
              I am not nursing now, but nursed both my kids on demand until 1 years old while I was working full time. I just want to applaud all women who devote themselves to nursing. Its not easy and we do not live in a society (well, at least here in the US) that encourages it. Working and nursing is even more difficult. Women who nurse past 1 year are considered "those weird alternative moms." You are bombarded with free formula. In the hospital, if you don't specifically ask, they will give your baby formula. There was no lactation concultant in the hospital. There were no family or friends who I could consult with. I went to the local LLL meeting. It was nice, but I didn't know anybody and everybody there were stay at home moms that didn't face the same challenges I did. Everybody at work used formula and couldn't understand why I was still nursing. When I travelled to client meetings, I had to find time to sneek away to pump.

              When I talk passionate about breastfeeding, people role their eyes and think "there she goes again."

              But to all those moms who are doing it, it is completely worth it. Don't give up. You will never look back and wish you had introduced formula sooner, but you probably will wish you had nursed longer.
              Freedom is just another word for nothing left to lose - Kris Kristofferson and Fred Foster (sung by Janis Joplin)

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              • #8
                nursing is also a form of bonding between a mom and a baby,practically you will save money and time..it is worth it if you spend time with your baby,as your child grows up she/he will get closer to you.

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                • #9
                  Yes, nursed all the kids who grew not sickly too. When i lst attended a breastfeeding seminar,the doc said she ws working when her sons were growing,and did she regret that they grew up nt healthy.

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                  • #10
                    I want to know if there will be any problem in BF due to a breast augmentation surgery I had 2 years before. I am planning to speak to my surgeon, Dr. Marcus Niessen about this as I am 4 months pregnant now and I want to nurse my child myself. A few of my friends who had BA have assured me that they were able to breastfeed their kids, but then I want to get it confirmed from my surgeon. Because I have read that it differs with each person. Is there anyone here who had BA and is not able to breastfeed your child?

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                    • #11
                      I'm a quite new to this thread. I'm just pregnant with twins and it's my first pregnancy. Iím curious how would I know that my breasts are ready for feeding? will i have any signs?

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                      • #12
                        When your babies are born, a sudden change in hormones will create the conditions for increased milk flow along with the suckling of the newborns. Search on "Milk production occurs after birth by allowing prolactin levels to remain elevated while progesterone and estrogen undergo an abrupt drop as they are rapidly cleared in 3-4 days after birth from the body." Newborns who have gone to full term with a mother who has had proper nutrition will have fat reserves that will allow them to go several days without significant ingestion of milk, however the sucking that they do during those days increases the mother's ability to produce greater quantities of milk later. During the later part of pregnancy, hormone levels may cause tender breasts and some milk leakage. There are many resources online about lactation and newborn babies. Search on key words to find them.
                        I have but one lamp by which my feet are guided, and that is the lamp of experience.
                        ...
                        Shall we gather strength by irresolution and inaction? Shall we acquire the means of effectual resistance by lying supinely on our backs and hugging the delusive phantom of hope, until our enemies shall have bound us hand and foot?

                        From a speech by Patrick Henry on March 23, 1775 at St. John's Church, Richmond, Virginia

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                        • #13
                          Hi gracee, I went back through your posts and did a little math. You should be about 8 months pregnant now if my calculations are correct. I can see why you are asking questions about breast feeding now. Have you started working with a lactation specialist if you want to breastfeed? Have you gone to classes?
                          I have but one lamp by which my feet are guided, and that is the lamp of experience.
                          ...
                          Shall we gather strength by irresolution and inaction? Shall we acquire the means of effectual resistance by lying supinely on our backs and hugging the delusive phantom of hope, until our enemies shall have bound us hand and foot?

                          From a speech by Patrick Henry on March 23, 1775 at St. John's Church, Richmond, Virginia

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                          • #14
                            For the mothers who are worrying about breastfeeding, it is to your notice that as much as you breastfed your babies. more healthy you and your baby will be. Breastfeeding is a technique or program through which you are able to develop strong mother & baby bond. Breast milk just acts like a vaccine to a baby and builds up strong immunity system for the baby.
                            Last edited by jns; 09-12-2017, 09:12 AM. Reason: Outbound links are not allowed.

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