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What Is Inspiration Porn & How Can We Stop It From Happening? Discuss!

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  • What Is Inspiration Porn & How Can We Stop It From Happening? Discuss!

    Do you have a disability and get tired of being told you're inspirational for doing everyday things? Or perhaps you consider it a true compliment?

    It isn't always easy to differentiate inspiration porn from the inspiration worthy so I wrote this article to help you learn how to spot it and stop it in its tracks.

    I would really love to hear your thoughts and experiences on this topic!

    You can read the entire article here:

    http://www.womens-health.com/inspiration-porn

  • Great article from a unique perspective. I think people are often uncomfortable around those who are "different" from ourselves. People with disabilities are ordinary people with challenges in life just like everyone else. Their challenges just may look a little different from our own.

    Comment


    • Such an awesome article, Emily!

      Reading this really opened my eyes to see things from a different perspective. I'm now thinking of post after post I've seen shared on social media from well-meaning people who were unknowingly sharing inspiration porn. And I can absolutely see where this type of thing is very demeaning to the disabled.

      As you eloquently stated in the article, there is a difference between sharing something that is truly an inspiration regardless of disability, but if the disability is the only reason you find it inspiration....don't share it. Don't contribute to it. People, disabled or not, don't want to be singled out and treated like they are inspiration by simply existing. Disabled people don't exist just to make able-bodied people feel better about themselves.

      Thanks for giving me a new perspective.

      "Be what you're looking for."

      Comment


      • Thank you!
        I definitely agree. Our perceptions of others who seem “different” can be hard to change, but when we look closer, there are more similarities than differences.

        Comment


        • Originally posted by Ashlee T. View Post
          Such an awesome article, Emily!

          Reading this really opened my eyes to see things from a different perspective. I'm now thinking of post after post I've seen shared on social media from well-meaning people who were unknowingly sharing inspiration porn. And I can absolutely see where this type of thing is very demeaning to the disabled.

          As you eloquently stated in the article, there is a difference between sharing something that is truly an inspiration regardless of disability, but if the disability is the only reason you find it inspiration....don't share it. Don't contribute to it. People, disabled or not, don't want to be singled out and treated like they are inspiration by simply existing. Disabled people don't exist just to make able-bodied people feel better about themselves.

          Thanks for giving me a new perspective.
          Thank you, Ashlee!

          I agree that it’s important to consider whether or not someone is truly inspirational or if the person is being held up as an inspiration just because the person is disabled. It takes time to ask ourselves these questions, but it’s so important that we do!

          Thank you again!

          Comment


          • An interesting article. Having a friend who had polio as a child (one of his legs ended up undersized so he has canes and a brace) has helped me appreciate the challenges that some people have and their desire to be treated as ordinary and normal.
            I have but one lamp by which my feet are guided, and that is the lamp of experience.
            ...
            Shall we gather strength by irresolution and inaction? Shall we acquire the means of effectual resistance by lying supinely on our backs and hugging the delusive phantom of hope, until our enemies shall have bound us hand and foot?

            From a speech by Patrick Henry on March 23, 1775 at St. John's Church, Richmond, Virginia

            Comment


            • Originally posted by jns View Post
              An interesting article. Having a friend who had polio as a child (one of his legs ended up undersized so he has canes and a brace) has helped me appreciate the challenges that some people have and their desire to be treated as ordinary and normal.
              It’s great that you could learn from your friend’s experiences. It really helped me as I grew up to hear about my grandma’s experiences with polio and post-polio. Thanks for reading!

              Comment

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