• If this is your first visit, be sure to check out the FAQ by clicking the link above. You may have to register before you can post: click the register link above to proceed. To start viewing messages, select the forum that you want to visit from the selection below.

Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

The more you eat, the hungrier you feel - do you agree?

Collapse
X
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

    The more you eat, the hungrier you feel - do you agree?

    Hello. Recently, I decided to rebuild my lifestyle and diet. I noticed that, starting with a large computer project, I spent much more time sitting, but I ate just as much. Therefore, I noticed that I received a little weight, enough to register mentally and make me realize that I'm on a slippery slope.
    I decided to do something. Therefore, I used the opportunity and the complete change of landscapes and the environment in order to rebuild my lazy lifestyle.
    I used the fact that I woke up and was eager to go at 5 am) to get up and walk. I avoided garbage, I ate much more protein at breakfast, I significantly reduced the serving sizes, and I replaced the fruit with chips, and I did not eat any snacks between meals.
    On my return home, I saved my improved way of life. I am extremely self-disciplined, so I really support a very low-calorie diet - perhaps about 1200 calories a day - which sounds awful, but it was not really difficult. Most people would probably be delighted, but the problem is that despite the fact that I ate much less, I honestly do not feel accordingly hungrier than when I probably ate twice that I now do. So now I have to train to eat again, otherwise I will lose too much weight! What is the problem?
    Satisfactory, but a little alarming when I stood on the scales, the other day I realized that in fact I shed more than one stone, and it was not so difficult for me to start
    But my question is: will you agree that the more you eat, the more you get used to food, and, therefore, you feel more hungry? I obviously significantly changed my metabolism to use energy more efficiently than before and release calories from other sources - for example, body fat - but not feeling uncomfortable hungry or getting low-sugar cocktails
    Did someone else have a similar experience?

    #2
    I have found if I'm eating healthy foods, obtaining better quality nutrition, even though I'm eating less - yes, I'm satisfied and don't feel as hungry, or cravings, etc. Even though my overall caloric intake is less, I just don't feel like I need more food. It's a beautiful thing isn't?
    I have a hefty appetite naturally, anyway.

    And, if I have a few days of letting bad habits creep into my routine, my appetite is out of control.

    Comment


      #3
      Well, I have given in to temptation: I had some fudge and nuts. However, I never touch ice cream or crisps. And I don't drink coca-cola or other fizzy drinks. The list goes on! Anyhow, allowing myself to eat stops the hunger and the cravings. If I don't eat, I get dizzy and sick and end up buying a packet of crisps. No: eating 3 meals a day is vital for me. And because of this I don't really snack.

      Comment


        #4
        Yes, Same with me

        Comment


          #5
          I'm not eating organic foods but my diet now contains mostly unprocessed foods and I do not get hungry as much while slowly losing weight.
          I have but one lamp by which my feet are guided, and that is the lamp of experience.
          ...
          Shall we gather strength by irresolution and inaction? Shall we acquire the means of effectual resistance by lying supinely on our backs and hugging the delusive phantom of hope, until our enemies shall have bound us hand and foot?

          From a speech by Patrick Henry on March 23, 1775 at St. John's Church, Richmond, Virginia

          Comment


            #6
            I do find if I deprive myself I actually want cakes and sweets more. If you give in to temptation without guilt you realize you actually want to eat fruit and vegetables and other healthy foods. Because dieting makes me bored, restless, obsessed with food, hungry, anxious: you name it. I don't want to live like that. I just one-day stopped punishing myself for being hungry and wanting to eat. Hunger is natural. This seems very odd, but that is how I approach my diet. I don't want to live in misery.

            Comment


              #7
              Same for me and my wife.

              It’s a minor source of frustration. We’ve been playing around with time restricted eating and intermittent fasting. We’ll go long stretches without eating, during which we’ll make these big plans about what we’ll eat. But once we start eating, our eyes are bigger than our stomachs. We get full with a little and just can’t eat any more.

              It’s nice to slim down. But one of the down sides is we’ve been wasting a lot of food just getting used to our new ways. I’m often not feeling hunger until I’ve gone a day or two without eating. I’ve realized that I’ve just been eating way too much my whole life.
              "Those sowing seed with tears
              Will reap with a joyful shout." - Psalm 126

              Comment


                #8
                I've tried going without food for a long stretch of time. Needless to say, I didn't get too far. I ate two packs of crisps yesterday, I was that hungry. And I never eat crisps! These diets are crazy and sheer torture. I just can't go without food for too long: I don't think many people can. But food isn't the enemy: I will now try to eat my cereal in the morning and have a light lunch and healthy dinner. Again, I don't want to live in misery.

                Comment

                Working...
                X