How to get rid of larder beetles??

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How to get rid of larder beetles??

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  • How to get rid of larder beetles??

    I have recently seen a couple larder beetles in my bedroom, I know they are attracted to dark places, wood and dry pet food. I have killed 2 today, and I am sure they have laid larva somewhere near my base boards. I keep the cat food in my bedroom as the dogs will end up eatting the cat food.

    I am going to clean my whole house from top to bottom, to make sure I get rid of them. But I am also wondering if there are natural ways to get rid of them? I do not want to use insecticide unless I really have too. I cannot move the cat food, so that is not an option. Any ideas would be quite helpful.

    I hate bugs so much, it does not matter which kind. And now I am getting paranoid that I have bedbugs, which I do not have but all the same I am paranoid. Help is needed...

  • Diatomaceous earth.
    It is completely natural, the food grade is safe for all mammals, you can even consume it to get rid of parasites. It looks and feels like brownish grey dust but to insects it is like razor wire. When they walk over it, it slices them up and they dehydrate and die. It won't kill the larva, not until they actually come in contact with it - it's not a poison. It has been used for centuries (it's mentioned in a Sherlock Homes story). You can also work it into your pet's skin to control fleas and ear mites.

    You can use a search engine to look it up. I manage apartment properties and treat all vacant units with it and am starting to treat some of the tenanted ones as well. Don't breathe it in, it can irritate your air passages just as any dust would.

    For bedbug prevention, work it into the areas where the floors join the walls, put on the edges between your mattresses and under your couch cushions. I live in a city with a high risk for bed bugs and have had no trouble in units treated with diatomaceous earth since we started using it. Vacuuming frequently also helps with insect control, especially with bed bugs. Always empty (outside) and clean the cannister immediately after vacuuming.

    Make sure your windows are well caulked and your screens fit snuggly. Reduce clutter as much as you can. Clear out anything you don't really need or love, that will reduce hiding places. Keep food consumption limited to specific areas to reduce crumbs and particles which might attract some insects. Keep your kitchen and eating areas clean. This includes regularly washing the walls to get rid of any splatters, cabinets and cupboards, inside and out, including the doors, Areas that are often missed and can harbor and feed roaches and other insects are the sides of the stove and fridge, the walls adjoining, and the floor underneath. Take out your trash regularly.

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    • Originally posted by WildChild View Post
      Diatomaceous earth.
      It is completely natural, the food grade is safe for all mammals, you can even consume it to get rid of parasites. It looks and feels like brownish grey dust but to insects it is like razor wire. When they walk over it, it slices them up and they dehydrate and die. It won't kill the larva, not until they actually come in contact with it - it's not a poison. It has been used for centuries (it's mentioned in a Sherlock Homes story). You can also work it into your pet's skin to control fleas and ear mites.

      You can use a search engine to look it up. I manage apartment properties and treat all vacant units with it and am starting to treat some of the tenanted ones as well. Don't breathe it in, it can irritate your air passages just as any dust would.

      For bedbug prevention, work it into the areas where the floors join the walls, put on the edges between your mattresses and under your couch cushions. I live in a city with a high risk for bed bugs and have had no trouble in units treated with diatomaceous earth since we started using it. Vacuuming frequently also helps with insect control, especially with bed bugs. Always empty (outside) and clean the cannister immediately after vacuuming.

      Make sure your windows are well caulked and your screens fit snuggly. Reduce clutter as much as you can. Clear out anything you don't really need or love, that will reduce hiding places. Keep food consumption limited to specific areas to reduce crumbs and particles which might attract some insects. Keep your kitchen and eating areas clean. This includes regularly washing the walls to get rid of any splatters, cabinets and cupboards, inside and out, including the doors, Areas that are often missed and can harbor and feed roaches and other insects are the sides of the stove and fridge, the walls adjoining, and the floor underneath. Take out your trash regularly.
      Nice information, thanks for sharing. It is very helpful.
      Get Home Design Ideas---> fashionhomestyle

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      • Yes, Bugs are very horrible. With the help of above technique we can save ourselves......

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        • Now its some caterpillar season, and millipedes outside too. I read clean the debris, the fallen leaves, etc.

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