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Dr & what would u do if anything

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  • Dr & what would u do if anything

    husband needed Dr note to continue work at home
    he's at higher risk
    his longtime Dr did not want to get involved & said if he gave note, he'd dismiss him as patient

    husband got note & Dr sent registered letter saying husband dismissed Dr & that husband said he would get another Dr- neither is true

    now husband is w/o Dr & this leaves him in bad situation as Drs not taking new pts now
    not that he'd go now but this is so not right
    would you do anything over this?

  • Originally posted by amy40 View Post
    husband needed Dr note to continue work at home
    he's at higher risk
    his longtime Dr did not want to get involved & said if he gave note, he'd dismiss him as patient

    husband got note & Dr sent registered letter saying husband dismissed Dr & that husband said he would get another Dr- neither is true

    now husband is w/o Dr & this leaves him in bad situation as Drs not taking new pts now
    not that he'd go now but this is so not right
    would you do anything over this?
    I have a HMO, Kaiser, and Kaiser would have to make another doctor available. I could do most of my visits using urgent care if I wanted to.

    Your husband's previous doctor would not be someone I would go to if I had a choice. He was probably trying to find an excuse to get rid of your husband. Maybe he isn't making enough money from your husband. A doctor's note during a pandemic for a patient at high risk is a no-brainer. It's not like he was prescribing too many pain killers. My older brother was almost killed by an alternate doctor who was too pig headed to listen to my father when he told the doctor he was giving my brother too much allergy medicine. Fortunately he was able to bring my brother back from the anaphylactic shock he put him into.

    Somewhere out there is a young doctor just starting out looking for patients. I found a young dentist looking for patients many years ago.
    I have but one lamp by which my feet are guided, and that is the lamp of experience.
    ...
    Shall we gather strength by irresolution and inaction? Shall we acquire the means of effectual resistance by lying supinely on our backs and hugging the delusive phantom of hope, until our enemies shall have bound us hand and foot?

    From a speech by Patrick Henry on March 23, 1775 at St. John's Church, Richmond, Virginia

    Comment


    • Do I understand you correctly-that the doctor said he'd dismiss your husband, but he actually sent a letter saying your husband dismissed the doctor?

      I'm not understanding why a doctor would not be supportive of a patient at higher risk? Do you mind sharing what makes him higher risk? Did he ask his employer first, if he could continue at home, or limit in-office days? Had he had a contentious relationship with the doctor prior, or have there been times the doc was a bit "grumpy"?

      And, why your husband needs the note? Does he have FMLA in place? if he has an ongoing health issue, that's a good idea, regardless how well his condition is managed, or pandemic status.
      In our state, there really is no note required. Employers have been instructed, by the governor, to give some consideration to those that have health concerns. It's not mandated, but that was a pretty strong indication that the workers will be supported if they need to stay home a few more weeks.

      I doubt you will be comfortable sharing the details, but I guess I don't have a clear picture of what happened.

      Were you there at the appointment to hear what was said?

      When you ask what anyone would do over this, do you mean file a complaint with the medical board, or lawsuit or?? I would just get a new doctor, based on what I understand of the situation...it sounds like he fired your husband as a patient, because he was uncomfortable doing what was asked of him, and that's that. I agree with jns, I wouldn't want to continue seeing a doctor that didn't support my needs.

      I haven't heard of doctors, in general, refusing new patients at this time. Appointments may be delayed however, or they may be via zoom, or other conferencing capability. And also, be aware, that this letter will be in his patient file, as well as other patient notes, and other doctor's offices you call, will see that, and potentially see that as a red flag, and choose not to see him. It may be seen as a difficulty, and doctor's don't want to add stress and potential trouble to their practice by what they see as a patient that doesn't cooperate. If it's a corporate health system, you may need to try going outside that corporate entity, and maybe to a neighboring town. As I recall you live in a pretty small area?

      So, for now, if he needs care, he can do a walk-in clinic, urgent care, or the ED. Good luck! I hope it all works out well, and soon!


      Comment


      • trying to delete some out of previous post but wont let me
        so please erase my last post

        Comment


        • Please do not send patient medical correspondence to the physician's home. That can be viewed as threatening. Take it up with the medical board or a lawyer if you're so inclined.

          If the doctor wrote a note, and the company rejected that note, I'm bound to think there's something more at play here. Think carefully about your options and choose wisely. If he doesn't show up to work at this time, he will likely not qualify for unemployment, right?

          Best of luck.

          Comment


          • I agree with atskitty2 , no notes to the doctor's home unless it is a place of business. If you want everything to come to a conclusion quickly, consult a good lawyer (I would say find one with expertise in labor law - I found mine through my union representative) and have the lawyer send a letter to the company. I did this for a labor law situation years ago and the situation resolved pretty quickly. Nothing said directly but a situation reverted to it's previous state. It cost me $2000 (lawyer writes letter and fields inquiries about it). Impressive as he-double hockey sticks. Of course, I was black listed for a decade. I don't know if a lawyer would charge more or less in this situation. A letter from a lawyer tells the other side that you are serious, very serious. A short talk with a lawyer would probably have the doctor reconsidering his rash move.
            I have but one lamp by which my feet are guided, and that is the lamp of experience.
            ...
            Shall we gather strength by irresolution and inaction? Shall we acquire the means of effectual resistance by lying supinely on our backs and hugging the delusive phantom of hope, until our enemies shall have bound us hand and foot?

            From a speech by Patrick Henry on March 23, 1775 at St. John's Church, Richmond, Virginia

            Comment


            • asked for my yesterday 5:13 post to be deleted
              still seeing it...please delete as tmi

              everything is a mess cause Dr didn't write on note what he has that would qualify him to stay work at home

              I always thought the Dr seemed to be borderline incompetent from how he's treated husband or lack of treatment but husband liked him for that reason (not doing a whole lot as men dont like to go Dr period.. so in and out basically)

              Comment


              • Your best option: get a new doctor. And contact a lawyer. Your husband has every right to justice: as you do yourself.

                Good luck and do keep us updated.

                Comment


                • amy40 I see no posts from you at 5:13 on any day.
                  I do see that you edited the post from 5/4, 9:24pm.

                  Comment


                  • atskitty2
                    the post I was referring to is gone as someone deleted it for me so thank you

                    Comment


                    • A letter from a lawyer would help the company in their decisions about your husband. If the company wants specific wording for a note, they should send a form dictating how the doctor must word it. I find doctors good at giving a patient advice but if they need to back their advice with written words to a business, they are all of a sudden reticent.
                      I have but one lamp by which my feet are guided, and that is the lamp of experience.
                      ...
                      Shall we gather strength by irresolution and inaction? Shall we acquire the means of effectual resistance by lying supinely on our backs and hugging the delusive phantom of hope, until our enemies shall have bound us hand and foot?

                      From a speech by Patrick Henry on March 23, 1775 at St. John's Church, Richmond, Virginia

                      Comment


                      • we've never used a lawyer so don't have one

                        everyday I'm composing a letter in my head to that Dr as it's not right what he did

                        Comment


                        • Agreed, jns.

                          Comment

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