Women’s Health Interactive Forums

  • If this is your first visit, be sure to check out the FAQ by clicking the link above. You may have to register before you can post: click the register link above to proceed. To start viewing messages, select the forum that you want to visit from the selection below.

Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Effects of stress?

Collapse
X
Collapse
  • Filter
  • Time
Clear All
new posts

  • Effects of stress?

    I've noticed over the last few months that my appetite has completely decreased and i often feel nauseous after eating. Mild enough that i'm not throwing up or anything, but still uncomfortable. It's also been a very stressful few months, so just wondering if it could just be an effect of stress? usually have a huge appetite and am very, very rarely sick

  • It could be also do you have any other symptoms?

    Comment


    • It's happened to me often in moments of stress to feel that way. It goes away when you start relaxing more and taking things more lightly.

      But with so little info like B16 said, could there be other symptoms, are you in a relationship and you might be pregnant? Many things could play a role but, if it's only that, don't worry it'll pass.

      Comment


      • I was thinking pregnant also but I don't know if they had anymore symptoms or if they are even female

        Comment


        • Originally posted by EimsieG View Post
          I've noticed over the last few months that my appetite has completely decreased and i often feel nauseous after eating. Mild enough that i'm not throwing up or anything, but still uncomfortable. It's also been a very stressful few months, so just wondering if it could just be an effect of stress? usually have a huge appetite and am very, very rarely sick
          Whilst it could well be stress-related, I feel it would be irresponsible of me not to strongly urge you to see a doctor. Perhaps you have a stomach ulcer that is irritated by eating and which causes a change in stomach pH, making it hared to digest a meal, leading to nausea.

          Alex

          Comment


          • no other symptoms really, it's just a bit uncomfortable more than anything! i am female, 22, very unlikely to be pregnant. this has been going on for a few months anyway, and have had a regular period the whole time. i've started a new job, & i'm on probation for the first year (which means inspectors coming in to visit and things) but am also finishing my honours degree in college so it's been a bit stressful. i'll ask the doctor about it anyway though, just in case. thanks a million!

            Comment


            • Originally posted by EimsieG View Post
              no other symptoms really, it's just a bit uncomfortable more than anything! i am female, 22, very unlikely to be pregnant. this has been going on for a few months anyway, and have had a regular period the whole time. i've started a new job, & i'm on probation for the first year (which means inspectors coming in to visit and things) but am also finishing my honours degree in college so it's been a bit stressful. i'll ask the doctor about it anyway though, just in case. thanks a million!
              It does sound like you are under pressure!

              Stress can be the catalyst that can turn a previously happy body into a bit of an over-reacting mess. For example a serious stress event (like the death of a loved one, serious illness, loss of employment, etc) has been linked to the onset of CFS (chronic fatigue syndrome) and IBS (irritable bowel syndrome).

              I would suggest that you read (yes I know you are doing and honours degree and are probably sick to death of reading, but this could pay off in the long run - it did for me and a lot of people that I work with) 'The Ultramind Solution' by Dr Mark Hyman.

              Essentially it details how to eat in a way that supports health and optimum mental and physical performance. According to the book, you need to eliminate certain irritant foodstuffs (wheat, gluten, dairy, preservatives, sweetners, etc) for a period of not less than 6 weeks in order to allow your body to reset it's inflammatory response back to 'normal'.

              Stress also depletes levels of glutathione (the bodies' chief anti-oxidant) and glutathione is crucial for normal cell function. However we DON'T want to be consuming anti-oxidants as such because studies show that taking in anti-oxidants from external sources causes a downregulation in our own anti-oxidant network. Yes I know that anti-oxidants are still very much en vogue, but if you look at the cutting edge/current best practice recommendations, you will find that the tide is turning. External anti-oxidants do have a place I believe, especially during periods of extreme oxidant activity (illness, massive stress), however they should only be used for as short a time as possible, to prevent your body getting accustomed to them.

              The good news is that we can boost our own production of glutathione simply by supplementing with the amino acid N-acetylcystine (NAC) since NAC is the limiting step in the reaction that creates glutathione.

              500mg /day of NAC should be enough and it is relatively cheap too. Not as tasty as a punnet of blueberries of course, but more effective and lacking in sugar

              Other things that can help are primarily related to modulating the effects of the 'stress hormone' cortisol. Phosphatidylserine (another beneficial amino acid), inositol (also an amino acid) and bacopa monnierri (an anxiolytic herb that may also help prevent formation of atherosclerosis) makes an awesome stack for controlling stress and improving sleep quality.

              There is actually a video put up on my friends' website which explains all of this in detail, but I'm new here and do not want people thinking I am only here to sell products or services, so all I will say is search for 'neurochill'.

              Meditation and exercise are awesome tools for combatting stress/cortisol - if you have the time. If not, I suggest that you try to make time

              Good luck! I remember the days of my own honours degree a few years ago. As a mature student I didn't have the social pressure to get blitzed on alcohol that many younger students experience so I had a relatively easy time of things. I'm sure you will do well, but try to appreciate that a little 'me time' done in a constructive way, now can help insure you against stress-induced sickness or absentee-ism in the future. Better to apply the brakes a little bit now, before you risk the wheels coming off!

              Alex

              Comment


              • that's brilliant, i'll definitely take that advice thank you! hard to be a teacher during the day & a student in the evenings & still have time to relax sometimes :P actually, could this also be causing palpitations? i seem to regularly be getting a racing heart out of nowhere (not necessarily when i'm feeling particularly stressed). i went to the hospital & had an echo, ECG, holter monitor and a stress test (all clear!), so nothing is actually physically wrong, but again, it's uncomfortable!

                Comment


                • Hey there. There are a lot of things stress can offer.
                  I can create head ache due to anxieties.
                  It losses your appetite because you feel depressed or problematic.
                  It can lose your weight because you are not eating and more. If I were you, do things that could make you feel satisfied and contented, If you love cooking, go and spend your spare time doing it. Just a thought.

                  Comment


                  • Stress can even make you loose your hair, this was happening to my husband a wile back and he realized it was because of the stress he had wich was caused by his job

                    Comment


                    • Two way effect of stress:

                      1. Positive Effect
                      Stress is positive when the person feels stimulated and able to manage the situation. This positive response prepares the body for action and activates the higher thinking centers of the brain. A positive response to stress can provide the energy to handle emergencies, meet challenges, and excel.


                      2. Negative Effect
                      Stress is negative when a person feels threatened and not in control of the situation. These feelings instigate a powerful reaction – affecting both the brain and body in ways that can be destructive to physical and mental health.

                      Comment

                      Womens Health orange logoGet The Newsletter

                      Receive our passionately crafted, medically reviewed articles and insights — the stuff nobody else talks about but you want to know — delivered right to your inbox.

                      Latest Posts in Our Forums

                      Collapse

                      Latest Topics in Our Forums

                      Collapse

                      Working...
                      X