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traveling and dealing with disability.

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  • traveling and dealing with disability.

    Hey guys, I just got to my aunt's place yesterday morning, a long flight of nearly 3 hours. I haven't been on a lot flights, never been out of the country unfortunately. From what I've gathered international flights have handicap restrooms, at least the bigger airplanes have these bathrooms. But most of the interstate flights don't, every time I've flown inside the us I've had to deal with going through the flight without changing my brief.

    This is because the toilets are so small I can't change by myself, I can't keep balance and change at the same time because it's so tiny. And I can imagine how it would be for wheelchair users. I could go without changing for a short flight like that but I always change immediately after a bowel accident to prevent skin damage and rashes, last year I had an accident just after take off and I ended up with a small diaper rash which took several days of painstaking care to get rid of. This time I applied a lot of barrier cream, free minutes into the flight I did have an accident, I've gotten used to the feeling so I just kept my mind off of it and got cleaned and changed at the airport. Avoided a potential rash this time. Surprisingly smell isn't a problem at all for me. I took Nullo which reduces the smell and wore plastic pants over the brief which always eliminates any smell so I'm glad I at least can control that.

    As for the tsa despite the news you hear of people being harassed by the tsa from my experience the been really professional. I go for a private pat down and a lady would pat down thoroughly and also check the prosthetic's. It's really professional so I don't really have any complaints. Medical statements go a long way so that's important I guess.

    These are times when having a colostomy would be useful, but I of course I've heard some horrible stories about colostomies getting detached/ infected.....i guess both have their pro's and cons.
    Anyone experience flight troubles? Or if there are any questions of how to deal with similar situations...

  • #2
    wow mia! sounds like you also handled it in a very professional, adult manner.

    I have no handicaps and I have never had any issues with security thankfully. I have had companions who are always pulled aside for the pat down and additional questions and searching done. She apparently meets some point of interest to them, because she said without fail she is pulled aside.

    enjoy your visit!!

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    • #3
      I hope that more places would offer wheelchair ramps that people could visit while traveling. A lot of good tourist spots need to put some steel handicap access ramps for wheelchair using people.
      Last edited by jns; 04-09-2017, 11:48 PM. Reason: Outbound links are not allowed.

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      • #4
        Originally posted by chasetathers View Post
        I hope that more places would offer wheelchair ramps that people could visit while traveling. A lot of good tourist spots need to put some steel handicap access ramps for wheelchair using people.
        Yes, when I was smaller I spent a lot of my time on a wheelchair and getting around proved to be difficult whenever we were on a family vacation. With my prosthetics it's impossible to do stairs without support and even inclined surfaces can be hard because the prosthetic's knee is mechanical and only bends to the swing of the walking motion, otherwise the knee is straight so walking up stairs is like walking up stairs without bending your knees or ankles.... Pretty hard right?
        Anyways whenever there's a lot of steps in a building I try to see if I can use the chair, but if the stairs aren't that long and have a railing to hold onto I can slug my way up them.

        I've seen some subways with lifts in every station which are for handicaps, I think it was Singapore....

        My college has plenty of ramps and handicap bathrooms-which are really useful for me, I guess it depends on the building and what it belongs to.

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        • #5
          Hi there, I agree that most of the place offers wheelchair ramp for travelers. I think providing the best ramp and bathroom for disabled is their job. I have also heard that the ramp can be carried out on your car and I think this is the best option you can go with. My friend who is disable recently bought a new wheelchair from and he used to carry his ramp when he is on vacation.
          Last edited by jns; 11-11-2017, 02:11 AM. Reason: Outbound links are not allowed.

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