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Type 2 diabetes

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  • Type 2 diabetes

    a study in Lancet medical Journal
    showed that participants were able to reverse type 2 diabetes after following a liquid diet of around 850 cal for 3-5 months

    can't find the info now, it was on yahoo news
    but I think it said even having diabetes up to 6 yrs, it could be reversed
    I don't know how many people were in the study, however
    Last edited by amy40; 12-06-2017, 01:06 PM.

  • #2
    These theories have been around for a long time, the underlying premise and causation of reversing diabetes is only in the losing weight. Even a 10% reduction in weight can alter blood glucose levels and also heart blood pressure.

    Think about it, it makes sense. What doesn't make sense is being on a 800 calorie per day diet. This will cause you to loose weight quickly but would not be good for you body in the long run or for a protracted period of time.

    A lower carb diet, avoid sugar, soft drinks etc. increase protein intake and exercise will do the same thing. It would keep you satisfied for longer decreasing yearnings for food.

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    • #3
      Originally posted by Claret View Post
      What doesn't make sense is being on a 800 calorie per day diet.
      To me, it makes perfect sense if you're fat and sick. I don't measure calories, but for about a quarter of this year, I'm sure I've been around that number, if not lower.
      "Those sowing seed with tears
      Will reap with a joyful shout." - Psalm 126

      Comment


      • #4
        A 800 calorie per day is not sustainable for most (OK for 80 pound inactive women who have a normal BMI). Further, it will tear away muscle as well as fat. Sustainable levels are around 15 calories per day for moderately active men and 12 calories per day for moderately active women. Reduce those to 13 and 10 for inactive men and women respectively. It would be better to calculate the calories needed for your target weight and reduce your calories to such while building a sustainable eating regime.
        Last edited by jns; 12-06-2017, 06:01 PM.
        I have but one lamp by which my feet are guided, and that is the lamp of experience.
        ...
        Shall we gather strength by irresolution and inaction? Shall we acquire the means of effectual resistance by lying supinely on our backs and hugging the delusive phantom of hope, until our enemies shall have bound us hand and foot?

        From a speech by Patrick Henry on March 23, 1775 at St. John's Church, Richmond, Virginia

        Comment


        • #5
          Iíd rather be slim, fit, and healthy than have huge muscles and failing organs under layers of fat.

          Also, you can mitigate muscle loss through exercise. It tells the body to prioritize fat for energy more heavily than it already does. But as someone thatís probably lost muscle, I can assure you that you donít miss it. I move around and get stuff done just fine Ė better, even.

          What people donít realize is that more muscle is necessary to move a fatter body, so itís not really usable for practical stuff. A fatter guy might bench press more, but if you want to move a couch, a wiry guy is better. The bigger man has his own weight holding him down, stressing his frame and his heart, and making him less agile.
          "Those sowing seed with tears
          Will reap with a joyful shout." - Psalm 126

          Comment


          • #6
            Stillness, I have type 2 diabetes, albeit diagnosed just one month ago. I can assure you I've never been obese. Okay, a couple of extra pounds but at my heaviest never more than 10 lbs over my (considered to be normal for my age and height) weight. The big culprit is that the liver cannot keep up with the supply of sugar in the blood stream so it just sits in there without your body making enough insulin to compensate. This can happen for many reasons, not just obesity. Having a sedentary lifestyle is certainly a big one and if we could get people out and about and moving more (me included) blood glucose or sugars can drop dramatically. On the other hand, a balanced diet of proteins and carbs (pick and choose carefully here) with the right proportions of each is essential for the body to create muscle, promote tissue and organ health. Protein is required to repair and build muscle and to help heal the body.

            Since my diagnoses I've sat with the Canadian Diabetes Association for their educational and nutritional information sessions. Trust me, if there was one diet or one food that could have reversed diabetes we would have been told about it. There are foods that will help lower blood glucose such as whole grain foods versus white processed foods.

            There is lots of information on the web from the Canadian Diabetes Association, the American Diabetes Association, Mayo Clinic etc.

            If you mean reverse Type II then yes, it can be done with diet and exercise and will drop numbers into the normal range. Even with all that I'm doing I still have morning readings of average of 8.0 - normal would be about 5.2

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            • #7
              Claret, I'm sorry about the diagnosis. And I'm not saying all diabetics are fat. I mentioned on another thread that my beloved stepfather has diabetes. He's put on a few pounds in his mid-sixties, but he's not been an obese guy.

              No offense intended, but I don't trust you or any association with my health. The problem is that a lot of these associations have been infiltrated with the messaging of or are being run by companies with goals that run counter to the things that keep people well.

              I actually saw Amy's study last night scrolling through yahoo. The vast majority of the people who participated in and stayed in the study stopped the diabetes. It's hard, cold science and it's not the only study out there like that. People are healing and restoring their bodies through non-pharmaceutical means, by using things like plant-based and reduced calorie diets. They work and we are being told about it.
              "Those sowing seed with tears
              Will reap with a joyful shout." - Psalm 126

              Comment


              • #8
                Originally posted by Claret View Post
                Even with all that I'm doing I still have morning readings of average of 8.0 - normal would be about 5.2
                Sorry to hear of your diagnosis, Claret. Morning readings done from capillary blood will usually be higher than your a1c number. What are you doing to get your readings down?

                I test twice a day before morning and evening meals. When my last test was done, those numbers averaged around a calculated 6.0 over 90 days but the doctor's test indicated 7.4 and a home test indicated 6.9 (I suspect callibration problems with the doctor's number). Since, I have dropped my 90 day calculated average to around 5.5. I take metformin and glipizide.
                I have but one lamp by which my feet are guided, and that is the lamp of experience.
                ...
                Shall we gather strength by irresolution and inaction? Shall we acquire the means of effectual resistance by lying supinely on our backs and hugging the delusive phantom of hope, until our enemies shall have bound us hand and foot?

                From a speech by Patrick Henry on March 23, 1775 at St. John's Church, Richmond, Virginia

                Comment


                • #9
                  jns, they would like me to drop morning numbers to below 7. They tell me that for me that would be good. Below that would be great. I'm on Metformin 2X daily, I've only been on it so don't know what my A1C levels are just yet, I'm to wait for 60 days to get an average A1C number. What am I doing? I'm trying to cut out any type of processed foods, lower sugar and carbohydrate intake, increase daily activity and still have my evening glass of red wine. By the way I'm told that the wine will not increase my numbers significantly and is good for heart health.

                  I only went and got my fasting glucose tested because both my daughter is diabetic, and this past summer my son had his lower left leg amputated due to an un-diagnosed diabetes and a foot blister that wouldn't heal. He (as I) had no symptoms, no weight loss, not thirst, no numbness in limbs etc.

                  When tested I want put on metformin and told to try diet and exercise and metformin. My numbers are not coming down to what I'd like, but I continue on.
                  Last edited by Claret; 12-07-2017, 11:25 PM.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Originally posted by Claret View Post
                    jns, they would like me to drop morning numbers to below 7. They tell me that for me that would be good. Below that would be great. I'm on Metformin 2X daily, I've only been on it so don't know what my A1C levels are just yet, I'm to wait for 60 days to get an average A1C number. What am I doing? I'm trying to cut out any type of processed foods, lower sugar and carbohydrate intake, increase daily activity and still have my evening glass of red wine. By the way I'm told that the wine will not increase my numbers significantly and is good for heart health.

                    I only went and got my fasting glucose tested because both my daughter is diabetic, and this past summer my son had his lower left leg amputated due to an un-diagnosed diabetes and a foot blister that wouldn't heal. He (as I) had no symptoms, no weight loss, not thirst, no numbness in limbs etc.

                    When tested I want put on metformin and told to try diet and exercise and metformin. My numbers are not coming down to what I'd like, but I continue on.
                    Only metformin worked for about seven years, then I had to add glipizide to keep the numbers in control. A low intake of processed foods helps a lot in weight control and glucose control. Metformin works by reducing insulin resistance so it is less likely to produce a low.
                    I have but one lamp by which my feet are guided, and that is the lamp of experience.
                    ...
                    Shall we gather strength by irresolution and inaction? Shall we acquire the means of effectual resistance by lying supinely on our backs and hugging the delusive phantom of hope, until our enemies shall have bound us hand and foot?

                    From a speech by Patrick Henry on March 23, 1775 at St. John's Church, Richmond, Virginia

                    Comment

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