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Diabetes Type 2

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    Diabetes Type 2

    I have recently been diagnosed with it. I'm trying to follow a better diet but struggling as my eating style has not been good for a long time and change isn't always easy. I know of all the things that can happen with Diabetes like blindness and other maladied. I ordered some supplements this morning. Hoping they will help my health. I was told to change my diet and will be going to a Diabetes Educator soon.

    #2
    I am also a type 2 diabetic. Diet modification can be a key part of managing diabetes. Generally I have found that portion control is better diet action than elimination of foods I like. I am more likely to maintain the diet and see results with it. Another thing that helps is substituting a lower carbohydrate food for a higher carbohydrate one.
    I have but one lamp by which my feet are guided, and that is the lamp of experience.
    ...
    Shall we gather strength by irresolution and inaction? Shall we acquire the means of effectual resistance by lying supinely on our backs and hugging the delusive phantom of hope, until our enemies shall have bound us hand and foot?

    From a speech by Patrick Henry on March 23, 1775 at St. John's Church, Richmond, Virginia

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      #3
      Thanks for your ideas!

      Comment


        #4
        I don't have Diabetes but I can understand your pain. I agree with jns's post: good advice. Anyhow, your doctor referring you to a Diabetes Educator is a step in the right direction. Did your doctor also advise you on foods to eat/avoid? I think being strict with what you're eating is a must. Obviously, you realize this. I do hope I've helped and you're not alone, Valeriesvoice. Many people have your condition. It shouldn't be too difficult to modify your diet.

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          #5
          I was just at the doctor's office today for my twice a year checkup after having blood tests the day before. The doctor was pleased that I have been keeping my diabetes under control and that I have been able to reduce my medication. The key has been losing weight and having a different diet, but not a specific one. Since I retired, I have spent half of my time in Cambodia and gotten away from a western style diet. There are still carbohydrates in my diet , mostly in the form of rice or rice noodles but with some wheat flour noodles. Very little of what I eat is processed. I walk more and occasionally swim in a pool. I have an adequate breakfast, usually a light lunch and a full supper. Lunch could be fruit or it could be vegetables, depending on what is available. Returning to the USA has led to weight gain and my diabetes numbers going up. When I go back my numbers and weight will go back down.
          I have but one lamp by which my feet are guided, and that is the lamp of experience.
          ...
          Shall we gather strength by irresolution and inaction? Shall we acquire the means of effectual resistance by lying supinely on our backs and hugging the delusive phantom of hope, until our enemies shall have bound us hand and foot?

          From a speech by Patrick Henry on March 23, 1775 at St. John's Church, Richmond, Virginia

          Comment


            #6
            You're right there, jns: Western diets do lead to weight gain, on the whole. When you're in a foreign country, you do lose weight. I have never been to where you've been, but noodles and rice dishes are low in calories. I do enjoy Asian cusine myself. Their goals are to eat healthily. Also, countries where sugar isn't a main diet staple, people's teeth are much whiter. Bet you never knew that! Anyhow, diabetes does need diet control. Whether that is noodles or just avoiding sugary foods.

            Comment


              #7
              Jns, have you tried cooking Asian dishes?

              I'm learning to cook some basic Thai recipes. It's not the same, but it's good, filling and nutritional mostly.

              Comment


                #8
                Originally posted by atskitty2 View Post
                Jns, have you tried cooking Asian dishes?

                I'm learning to cook some basic Thai recipes. It's not the same, but it's good, filling and nutritional mostly.
                My wife is such a good cook, I don't. I do know how to make rice, though. I learned how to make sticky rice from her and occasionally cook it for her when she wants it ready when she gets back. Usually it is soaked overnight or at least for around six hours to get moisture inside of it before steaming. I experimented using warm and hot water for the soaking and found that by using hot water, the soaking can be as short as about two hours. Any shorter will leave the center of the grains hard and chalky. My wife has used this technique on occasion to cook sticky rice faster. She tends to use a rice cooker, but I also taught her how to pan cook rice with just the right amount of water so it doesn't need draining. She burned it regularly until she got the hang of it. My technique is to add water so the level of the water is twice as high as that of the rice then simmer it for 15 minutes after reaching a boil. I measure the water with my finger these days and it always comes out good.
                I have but one lamp by which my feet are guided, and that is the lamp of experience.
                ...
                Shall we gather strength by irresolution and inaction? Shall we acquire the means of effectual resistance by lying supinely on our backs and hugging the delusive phantom of hope, until our enemies shall have bound us hand and foot?

                From a speech by Patrick Henry on March 23, 1775 at St. John's Church, Richmond, Virginia

                Comment


                  #9
                  I love rice, jns: in fact, I ate rice last night. I love soft & fluffy Jasmine rice. Definitely the best. I also enjoy eating noodles. They are one of my favourite lunches [next to cheese toasties!]. Anyhow, Asian diets do generally decrease weight. I think this is because there are so many sugars and salts and fats in the Western diet and not in Asian food. Plus, Asian food is delicious. I definitely enjoy Chinese food: including homemade.

                  Comment


                    #10
                    Originally posted by Popcorn&Candy View Post
                    I don't have Diabetes but I can understand your pain. I agree with jns's post: good advice. Anyhow, your doctor referring you to a Diabetes Educator is a step in the right direction. Did your doctor also advise you on foods to eat/avoid? I think being strict with what you're eating is a must. Obviously, you realize this. I do hope I've helped and you're not alone, Valeriesvoice. Many people have your condition. It shouldn't be too difficult to modify your diet.
                    Thank you for your understanding. The word "strict" makes me cringe...lol...I have learned since seeing the Diabetes Educator and reading the book and taking my numbers that I don't have to be strict in what I eat but like the other person said "portion control." You can eat just about anything as long as you have smaller portions of foods that are nutritious.

                    Comment


                      #11
                      Originally posted by jns View Post
                      I was just at the doctor's office today for my twice a year checkup after having blood tests the day before. The doctor was pleased that I have been keeping my diabetes under control and that I have been able to reduce my medication. The key has been losing weight and having a different diet, but not a specific one. Since I retired, I have spent half of my time in Cambodia and gotten away from a western style diet. There are still carbohydrates in my diet , mostly in the form of rice or rice noodles but with some wheat flour noodles. Very little of what I eat is processed. I walk more and occasionally swim in a pool. I have an adequate breakfast, usually a light lunch and a full supper. Lunch could be fruit or it could be vegetables, depending on what is available. Returning to the USA has led to weight gain and my diabetes numbers going up. When I go back my numbers and weight will go back down.
                      I have not been on meds yet because my blood sugar numbers have not been as high as needed to warrant meds. I have had some very good numbers like 101, 105 and some somewhat higher and then when I wanted something sweeter the number went up. I have learned what I can eat. Rice, noodles are high calorie, high starchy carb foods and we eat much smaller portions of them. I am eating veggies I never ate before. I have squash and eggplant in the frig now and usually don't but they are good for me so I will bake them. The diabetic educator nurse wants my number below 125 when I see her. Yesterday morning my bs was 121 and I have had many days below that. I am new at this so it's all a new frontier for me. Actually, for awhile I felt like "no, why me? why do I have to do this?" I have to accept what I have and deal with intelligently. I don't want to go blind. I have peripheral neuropathy already as the doctor examined my feet on 7/2 and I found that out. If I'm not careful it can lead to toe amputation or foot or leg amputation, yikes I don't want that! Thank you for your reply.

                      Comment


                        #12
                        Originally posted by Popcorn&Candy View Post
                        You're right there, jns: Western diets do lead to weight gain, on the whole. When you're in a foreign country, you do lose weight. I have never been to where you've been, but noodles and rice dishes are low in calories. I do enjoy Asian cusine myself. Their goals are to eat healthily. Also, countries where sugar isn't a main diet staple, people's teeth are much whiter. Bet you never knew that! Anyhow, diabetes does need diet control. Whether that is noodles or just avoiding sugary foods.
                        Yes, our diets make many of us large and diabetic! Never been anywhere outside of USA except Canada when I was 12 so haven't had the opportunity to lose weight there. Noodles are not good for diabetics, they are high calorie carbs. Whole grain rice and pastas are better but we have small, small portions.

                        Comment


                          #13
                          Originally posted by atskitty2 View Post
                          Jns, have you tried cooking Asian dishes?

                          I'm learning to cook some basic Thai recipes. It's not the same, but it's good, filling and nutritional mostly.
                          I've never tried cooking them but one has to be careful of the sauces, they can be very sweet. The asian veggies are very good for one, though.

                          Comment


                            #14
                            Originally posted by Valeriesvoice View Post
                            Noodles are not good for diabetics, they are high calorie carbs. Whole grain rice and pastas are better but we have small, small portions.
                            Read more about glycemic index and the modification of the glycemic index of foods. Adding fats and proteins can slow down the absorption of carbohydrates and essentially lower the glycemic index. Also understand the glycemic load. One thing I have found is that more processed foods give me higher readings than less processed foods.
                            I have but one lamp by which my feet are guided, and that is the lamp of experience.
                            ...
                            Shall we gather strength by irresolution and inaction? Shall we acquire the means of effectual resistance by lying supinely on our backs and hugging the delusive phantom of hope, until our enemies shall have bound us hand and foot?

                            From a speech by Patrick Henry on March 23, 1775 at St. John's Church, Richmond, Virginia

                            Comment


                              #15
                              jns, I continue trying to master the art of cooking rice, and cooking these darn rice noodles.
                              I simply don't know what I'm doing wrong or why they always come out wrong. I've watched videos and read online about how to cook the rice noodles perfectly, but, they still come out either too sticky or turn to mush. I've given up on rice. I'll have to get a cooker I guess.

                              Valeriesvoice you're correct, a lot of those sauces can be quite sweet. That's the beauty of cooking at home, you can control the added sugar, and the ratio of veggies in the dishes. I tend to load up on the veggies, so the noodles/sauce are there for flavor and texture and the veggies are the highlight. If I add a protein (chicken, shrimp, tofu), it is again, not the focus. The veggies are the main part of my dishes. I often double, or even triple the veggies, and cut back on the sauce.

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