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Diabetes Type 2

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    #16
    Originally posted by atskitty2 View Post
    jns, I continue trying to master the art of cooking rice, and cooking these darn rice noodles.
    I simply don't know what I'm doing wrong or why they always come out wrong. I've watched videos and read online about how to cook the rice noodles perfectly, but, they still come out either too sticky or turn to mush. I've given up on rice. I'll have to get a cooker I guess.
    I have not made rice noodles, but my wife does and I have seen them made at roadside vendors. My wife puts them in rapidly boiling water for a short time. Road side vendors do the same thing but they don't pour out the boiling water. Instead they use a long handled straining spoon made of wire mesh to fish them out. Some use a long handled wire mesh cup that stays in the boiling water. Taking them out at the right time is crucial. They will continue to cook a bit after being taken out due to being hot. For a specific type of rice noodle, such as rice stick, try putting them in the boiling water for a minute, then take them out and check the results. Try longer or shorter based on the results you get. It is crucial to get all of the noodles immersed in water at about the same time. Mushy means too long cooking. Sticky probably means too low of temperature and maybe too long.
    I have but one lamp by which my feet are guided, and that is the lamp of experience.
    ...
    Shall we gather strength by irresolution and inaction? Shall we acquire the means of effectual resistance by lying supinely on our backs and hugging the delusive phantom of hope, until our enemies shall have bound us hand and foot?

    From a speech by Patrick Henry on March 23, 1775 at St. John's Church, Richmond, Virginia

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      #17
      Yes, that's what I've been doing-the boiling water, then retrieving them with a large mesh utensil. I also read and tried not leaving them in boiling water, but bringing the water to a boil and removing from heat, then allow the noodles to sit for 18-20 minutes in that hot water. That method probably yielded the most palatable noodle, once, but the results weren't the same next time, so I tried another method. I tried wider noodles, thinner, different brands, tried a cold water bath after the cooking time, to stop the cooking action, and I even asked the ladies at the Asian grocery where I shop, what I'm doing wrong. They said they use the same method...the only suggestion they had was to NOT stir them at all in the water, not even if they start sticking together. Tried that, and wound up with an inch-thick clump of hard, stuck-together noodles that had to go straight into the disposal. lol It's been an adventure, but I'm not giving up. I set a timer each try, and check the noodles before they should be done, trying to avoid the mush...seems like I just can't catch that perfect window of time, and it seems like a very narrow window when they aren't hard and sticky, and haven't turned to mush.

      My next attempt will include using bottled water, rather than tap. I'm running out of ideas.

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        #18
        I'll look carefully the next time I am at a street vendor getting a noodle dish. I know that they do not have a cold water bath and they have no time to stir the noodles. They measure a bowls worth of noodle soup by tearing off a handful or two of dry noodles. It is fast food so they do not have a lot of extra time to cook the noodles. The noodle come out in a clump but are easily separated with chopsticks which are the preferred utensils to eat noodle soup with along with a spoon for the broth. The dish is assembled by putting the clump of noodles in a bowl, ladling very hot broth over them and then garnishing the dish with vegetables and meats. If it is to go, the noodles and the broth are put in separate plastic bags with the garnish going in with the noodles.
        I have but one lamp by which my feet are guided, and that is the lamp of experience.
        ...
        Shall we gather strength by irresolution and inaction? Shall we acquire the means of effectual resistance by lying supinely on our backs and hugging the delusive phantom of hope, until our enemies shall have bound us hand and foot?

        From a speech by Patrick Henry on March 23, 1775 at St. John's Church, Richmond, Virginia

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          #19
          jns, I do typically put the noodles directly into the pan or dish they're to be served in/from. I'll keep working on this. Any new tips you can share, please do! Oddly enough, they seemed to be better when I tried my hand at ramen several weeks ago.

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            #20
            Originally posted by atskitty2 View Post
            jns, I do typically put the noodles directly into the pan or dish they're to be served in/from. I'll keep working on this. Any new tips you can share, please do! Oddly enough, they seemed to be better when I tried my hand at ramen several weeks ago.
            Ramen noodles are usually wheat noodles so they cook somewhat different than rice noodles.
            I have but one lamp by which my feet are guided, and that is the lamp of experience.
            ...
            Shall we gather strength by irresolution and inaction? Shall we acquire the means of effectual resistance by lying supinely on our backs and hugging the delusive phantom of hope, until our enemies shall have bound us hand and foot?

            From a speech by Patrick Henry on March 23, 1775 at St. John's Church, Richmond, Virginia

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              #21
              This recipe called for rice noodles...
              Er...wait...was I making pho that day? No, both I'm sure called for rice noodles, because I haven't used regular noodles in anything other than spaghetti in over a year.

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                #22
                jns, this weekend, I think I finally mastered the rice noodle. I put them in the hot water for a little more than half the recommended time, then moved them into the pan with veggies to finish cooking. They came out perfect. I had much more control over the tenderness that way. Sweet victory!

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                  #23
                  Originally posted by atskitty2 View Post
                  jns, this weekend, I think I finally mastered the rice noodle. I put them in the hot water for a little more than half the recommended time, then moved them into the pan with veggies to finish cooking. They came out perfect. I had much more control over the tenderness that way. Sweet victory!
                  Hooray for success at last!

                  Now for using a saucepan to cook rice. I usually use a saucepan sized so the cooked rice fills up at least half of the saucepan. Wash the rice several times to reduce the stickiness. Put in water so it is an equally deep layer on top of the rice. In other words, if the rice takes up one inch, fill water to the two inch level (the cooked rice will be slightly above the water level.) Bring to a boil, then immediately reduce to a simmer. Keep mostly covered (uncover just enough to keep the simmering from bubbling over - I use a gas stove and reduce the flame so it barely keeps lit - a strainer lid saucepan can help if the holes are toward the pour spouts). Cook for exactly 15 minutes. Let set for several minutes after turning the burner off. If you use an electric element, take the saucepan off of the burner. I like Revere Ware copper clad bottom stainless steel saucepans for making rice and also have had good results with Farberware stainless steel saucepans with an aluminum bottom core insert. I like the stainless steel for the finish and durability but stainless steel does not spread heat evenly enough, so the cladding or inserts help out. Pure aluminum thin wall saucepans burn in my trials as can stainless steel saucepans although I can usually get a stainless steel saucepan to work without burning. I have not tried Teflon coated saucepans or other types such as glass saucepans. Add or subtract just a bit of water to make the rice wetter or drier. Drier rice is more likely to burn. Wetter rice can be dried out to a small degree by spreading it out and turning it so more steam escapes.
                  I have but one lamp by which my feet are guided, and that is the lamp of experience.
                  ...
                  Shall we gather strength by irresolution and inaction? Shall we acquire the means of effectual resistance by lying supinely on our backs and hugging the delusive phantom of hope, until our enemies shall have bound us hand and foot?

                  From a speech by Patrick Henry on March 23, 1775 at St. John's Church, Richmond, Virginia

                  Comment


                    #24
                    Only drawback with this, was that my veggies were overcooked, but now that I know this method can work, I'll adjust that time and it should be a perfect dish!

                    I'll try that with my rice, jns. I'm just about to treat myself to a new set of pots, so I'll keep that in mind while selecting my next brand/type.

                    Comment


                      #25
                      Fast food An Unhealthy Diets is an extremely unhealthy food. It affects your body functioning that includes blood pressure, heart, headache, acne, increases weight, piles up calories and more. for more information
                      Last edited by jns; 09-18-2018, 12:38 AM. Reason: Outbound links are not allowed.

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                        #26
                        Type 2 diabetes is curable, from what I’ve seen. I’ve seen multiple methods involving diet - stuff that’s been known for decades.

                        I just saw that people have been curing it with white rice, sugar, and fruit juice since the late 30’s. My own sugar levels normalized after juicing. I’ve heard accounts from tons of people eliminating it with things like fasting, time-restricted eating, or plant-based diets. There were some recent experiments (within the past couple of years) very successfully eliminating it with calorie reduction and liquid fasting. Those showed people cured that had their onset for up to six years prior, if I remember correctly.

                        I imagine that if the kidneys become too damaged, this stuff may be harder, or impossible to succeed with, but I don’t know. I wish I did, because I’ve got a family member dealing with advanced kidney failure now.
                        "Those sowing seed with tears
                        Will reap with a joyful shout." - Psalm 126

                        Comment


                          #27
                          I'm so sorry, Stillness. I hope your family member recovers soon. I know that is terribly weak, but feel free to talk about it. Again, I am sorry to hear that.

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                            #28
                            Originally posted by Popcorn&Candy View Post
                            I'm so sorry, Stillness. I hope your family member recovers soon. I know that is terribly weak, but feel free to talk about it. Again, I am sorry to hear that.
                            Thanks P&C!
                            "Those sowing seed with tears
                            Will reap with a joyful shout." - Psalm 126

                            Comment


                              #29
                              Originally posted by Valeriesvoice View Post
                              I have recently been diagnosed with it. I'm trying to follow a better diet but struggling as my eating style has not been good for a long time and change isn't always easy. I know of all the things that can happen with Diabetes like blindness and other maladied. I ordered some supplements this morning. Hoping they will help my health. I was told to change my diet and will be going to a Diabetes Educator soon.
                              Your diet is the #1 factor when it comes to maintaining blood glucose level. Do exercise as well and avoid the consumption of sugar, alcohol and smoking. Always focus on a proper diet plan and you are all good.

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                                #30
                                You're right, vebu.

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