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Diabetes Type 2

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    #16
    Originally posted by atskitty2 View Post
    jns, I continue trying to master the art of cooking rice, and cooking these darn rice noodles.
    I simply don't know what I'm doing wrong or why they always come out wrong. I've watched videos and read online about how to cook the rice noodles perfectly, but, they still come out either too sticky or turn to mush. I've given up on rice. I'll have to get a cooker I guess.
    I have not made rice noodles, but my wife does and I have seen them made at roadside vendors. My wife puts them in rapidly boiling water for a short time. Road side vendors do the same thing but they don't pour out the boiling water. Instead they use a long handled straining spoon made of wire mesh to fish them out. Some use a long handled wire mesh cup that stays in the boiling water. Taking them out at the right time is crucial. They will continue to cook a bit after being taken out due to being hot. For a specific type of rice noodle, such as rice stick, try putting them in the boiling water for a minute, then take them out and check the results. Try longer or shorter based on the results you get. It is crucial to get all of the noodles immersed in water at about the same time. Mushy means too long cooking. Sticky probably means too low of temperature and maybe too long.
    I have but one lamp by which my feet are guided, and that is the lamp of experience.
    ...
    Shall we gather strength by irresolution and inaction? Shall we acquire the means of effectual resistance by lying supinely on our backs and hugging the delusive phantom of hope, until our enemies shall have bound us hand and foot?

    From a speech by Patrick Henry on March 23, 1775 at St. John's Church, Richmond, Virginia

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      #17
      Yes, that's what I've been doing-the boiling water, then retrieving them with a large mesh utensil. I also read and tried not leaving them in boiling water, but bringing the water to a boil and removing from heat, then allow the noodles to sit for 18-20 minutes in that hot water. That method probably yielded the most palatable noodle, once, but the results weren't the same next time, so I tried another method. I tried wider noodles, thinner, different brands, tried a cold water bath after the cooking time, to stop the cooking action, and I even asked the ladies at the Asian grocery where I shop, what I'm doing wrong. They said they use the same method...the only suggestion they had was to NOT stir them at all in the water, not even if they start sticking together. Tried that, and wound up with an inch-thick clump of hard, stuck-together noodles that had to go straight into the disposal. lol It's been an adventure, but I'm not giving up. I set a timer each try, and check the noodles before they should be done, trying to avoid the mush...seems like I just can't catch that perfect window of time, and it seems like a very narrow window when they aren't hard and sticky, and haven't turned to mush.

      My next attempt will include using bottled water, rather than tap. I'm running out of ideas.

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        #18
        I'll look carefully the next time I am at a street vendor getting a noodle dish. I know that they do not have a cold water bath and they have no time to stir the noodles. They measure a bowls worth of noodle soup by tearing off a handful or two of dry noodles. It is fast food so they do not have a lot of extra time to cook the noodles. The noodle come out in a clump but are easily separated with chopsticks which are the preferred utensils to eat noodle soup with along with a spoon for the broth. The dish is assembled by putting the clump of noodles in a bowl, ladling very hot broth over them and then garnishing the dish with vegetables and meats. If it is to go, the noodles and the broth are put in separate plastic bags with the garnish going in with the noodles.
        I have but one lamp by which my feet are guided, and that is the lamp of experience.
        ...
        Shall we gather strength by irresolution and inaction? Shall we acquire the means of effectual resistance by lying supinely on our backs and hugging the delusive phantom of hope, until our enemies shall have bound us hand and foot?

        From a speech by Patrick Henry on March 23, 1775 at St. John's Church, Richmond, Virginia

        Comment


          #19
          jns, I do typically put the noodles directly into the pan or dish they're to be served in/from. I'll keep working on this. Any new tips you can share, please do! Oddly enough, they seemed to be better when I tried my hand at ramen several weeks ago.

          Comment


            #20
            Originally posted by atskitty2 View Post
            jns, I do typically put the noodles directly into the pan or dish they're to be served in/from. I'll keep working on this. Any new tips you can share, please do! Oddly enough, they seemed to be better when I tried my hand at ramen several weeks ago.
            Ramen noodles are usually wheat noodles so they cook somewhat different than rice noodles.
            I have but one lamp by which my feet are guided, and that is the lamp of experience.
            ...
            Shall we gather strength by irresolution and inaction? Shall we acquire the means of effectual resistance by lying supinely on our backs and hugging the delusive phantom of hope, until our enemies shall have bound us hand and foot?

            From a speech by Patrick Henry on March 23, 1775 at St. John's Church, Richmond, Virginia

            Comment


              #21
              This recipe called for rice noodles...
              Er...wait...was I making pho that day? No, both I'm sure called for rice noodles, because I haven't used regular noodles in anything other than spaghetti in over a year.

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