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Abnormal Pap Smear after Gardisil vaccine

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  • Abnormal Pap Smear after Gardisil vaccine

    My doctor called me today stating that my pap smear results are abnormal and wants me to go see the gynecologist for a colposcopy. My last pap smear two years ago was normal. I've never had abnormal results. I thought I would be low risk for hpv. I was a virgin until 27 and had the hpv vaccination series at 26 before having sex. I'm 31 and have been with my husband for 3 years with only one partner before him but I know the shot does not prevent everything nor all strains of hpv. And I know that while I've only had two partners both my husband and my ex had a lot more.

    My pcp did not know what was making the results abnormal so he referred me. I'm really scared right now. We've been ttc our second child and been struggling with secondary infertility due to pcos so this is scaring me.

  • Nearly all women will experience an abnormal pap smear in their life, everything from yeast infections to the time in your cycle can cause an abnormal result. During a pap smear they are looking for cells under the microscope that look different than the other regular cell shapes as well as signs of infection from viruses or bacteria. If there are cells different looking they call it "abnormal" because technically it is abnormal since it is not the normal regular shape. There will be abnormal cells during any pap smear because there is always cells in different stages of growth but the number of abnormal cells or ones that are drastically different and medically a red flag will be noted and from those results the doctor will ask that more tests be done. This step is purely precautionary, not all abnormal pap smears lead to problems most will come back normal the second time around. But the doctor referring you is a good thing, if something is there then the other pap smears afterwards can help in a diagnosis and early detection of anything is a good thing.
    There are those who believe that dictionaries should not merely reflect the times but also protect English from the mindless assaults of the trendy.

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    • I saw the gynecologist yesterday for the colposcopy. He did say I had a yeast infection and put me on diflucan. But rom what he said hpv is very likely and my chart said 'squamish cells' but I do not know what that means. I will know for sure when the results come back. I am confused though since I have been with my husband for 3.5 years and we have been monogamous how I could have a normal during my pregnancy with our now 2 year old in fall of 2009 but have an abnormal one 2.5 years later and be told it is likely hpv. I don't think my husband cheated. I did read that it could lie dormant in one of us for a long period of time. Is that true?

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      • I think you mean squamous cells. They were probably just testing for vaginal cancer or abnormal cells in the cervix.
        Things are usually normal however, Vaginal cancer is a disease in which malignant (cancer) cells form in the vagina.


        Vaginal cancer is not common. When found in early stages, it can often be cured. There are two main types of vaginal cancer:

        Squamous cell carcinoma: Cancer that forms in squamous cells, the thin, flat cells lining the vagina. Squamous cell vaginal cancer spreads slowly and usually stays near the vagina, but may spread to the lungs and liver. This is the most common type of vaginal cancer. It is found most often in women aged 60 or older.
        That which we forget may as well never really happened.

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