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HPV questions

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  • HPV questions

    So I have been in a monogamous relationship for the past 8 years, so I don't have much sexual experience. Now I am single for the first time in my adult life and ready to mingle (ha ha). I have had feelings for my roommate for the past few months but we have kept it as friends. Recently I feel as we have emotionally grown closer and I very much would like more. The other night he let me know that he has HPV - non cancerous strain but basically he has genital warts. I believe he has told me so that I can decide for myself if our flirting should go any further. Problem is I don't know much about HPV other than reading on the internet that it is very common.
    I also have a fear that I could get it from sharing a shower and toilet with him? and if we were to kiss ever would I have a chance of getting it?
    I guess I should go to the doctor and get a vaccine and ask questions. Reading up on it, it looks like vaccines are only really given to women up to age 26 and I am 26 now so I guess its not too late!
    Any advice or knowledge on the subject would be greatly appreciated!

  • #2
    I would read up about HPV from several sources on the internet. Then consult with your doctor about getting the vaccine. From what I read, you wouldn't get it from a toilet seat or a shower. I also read that condoms are only partially effective since there is still some skin to skin contact for transmission.
    I have but one lamp by which my feet are guided, and that is the lamp of experience.
    ...
    Shall we gather strength by irresolution and inaction? Shall we acquire the means of effectual resistance by lying supinely on our backs and hugging the delusive phantom of hope, until our enemies shall have bound us hand and foot?

    From a speech by Patrick Henry on March 23, 1775 at St. John's Church, Richmond, Virginia

    Comment


    • #3
      In many cases, there are no obvious symptoms. If you do get symptoms, they can take anywhere from a month to a year or longer to show up after you're exposed to genital HPV.

      A few of the more than 40 different strains of genital HPV may cause you to develop genital warts.(Some types of HPV cause the common warts you can get on your hands and feet, but genital HPV strains usually affect only the genital area.)

      Genital warts are very contagious. Researchers estimate that about 65 percent of people who have sex with a partner with warts will end up developing warts themselves.

      The warts usually show up in or around your vagina and vulva, near your anus and in your rectum, on your cervix, and sometimes on the skin near the groin area.(You can also get warts in your mouth and throat from performing oral sex on an infected partner, but this is rare.)

      The warts are soft and skin-colored or lighter. They can be small or large, flat or raised. There may be one or many, sometimes growing in clusters with a cauliflower-like appearance. They're usually painless, though they may occasionally itch, burn, or bleed.

      In about 20 percent of women, the warts go away on their own within three months. For most other women, treatment will help to clear up the warts, though they may recur.

      In some cases, genital HPV causes changes in your cervical cells that are detectable on a Pap smear. Often these changes are mild and go away on their own.

      But if you have one of the so-called "high-risk strains" of HPV, it may cause more serious cell changes. These cell changes may turn into cancer usually many years later if you don't get the necessary treatment.

      These high-risk strains are the cause of almost all cervical cancer.(Note that these strains are not the same ones that cause genital warts.) That's one reason it's so important for all women to get regular Pap smears and for those who have abnormalities to follow up with any necessary testing and treatment.

      The good news is that in the vast majority of cases, the immune system keeps the virus under control or destroys it even the high-risk strains. Most women are free of the virus within a year or two after they're diagnosed.

      Only a small percentage of women with HPV develop cell changes that need to be treated, and with proper screening and treatment, only rarely does HPV lead to cervical cancer or other types of genital cancer.

      Comment


      • #4
        I have read that HPV16 causes oral cancer at four times the rate in men as it does women when all other factors have been taken into account, due to a lowered immune response. Vaccination seems like the only way to guard against the HPV that can cause the cancer in many cases.
        I have but one lamp by which my feet are guided, and that is the lamp of experience.
        ...
        Shall we gather strength by irresolution and inaction? Shall we acquire the means of effectual resistance by lying supinely on our backs and hugging the delusive phantom of hope, until our enemies shall have bound us hand and foot?

        From a speech by Patrick Henry on March 23, 1775 at St. John's Church, Richmond, Virginia

        Comment

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