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Is anyone asocial?

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    Is anyone asocial?

    I'm pretty much asocial irl, too afraid to be judged to make friends or open up to anyone. I seriously am suspecting everyone to want to hurt me, which it's what's they've ended up doing. I hate social situations and have 0 people's skills. I have something called "social ineptitude", preferring to mind my own business, live in my own world. Does anyone else have that?

    #2
    I can be like that, but I still socialize a lot and am trying to be more brave. I remember everybody's name and always say hello and make small talk. I would certainly love to be more social, but that isn't me. I just love sitting alone and working. But I don't isolate myself. I can often live in my own world, but that world gets too small sometimes. I am changing into a more confident person as the years pass, but every so often I hit a glitch, which is hard. Still, I try my best. I think their best is all anyone can do. But you're definitely not alone, Naiwen. It is the way you're built.

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      #3
      Originally posted by Naiwen View Post
      too afraid to be judged to make friends or open up to anyone. I hate social situations and have 0 people's skills.
      when younger, especially high school, I was also afraid of being judged
      hardly spoke then except for one on one situations but in groups, kept quiet for fear of saying something wrong
      as you get older you realize it is more imp. to be yourself and if someone's judges you or doesn't like you, SO WHAT

      since am an introvert, do still dislike certain social situations such as going to something at husband's work
      something coming up and am already a little nervous as don't want to embarass husband by saying something "goofy" in front of his co-workers
      I have a different sense of humor so what I think is funny, isn't to most people
      will know when saying something wrong as will get the disapproving look from husband lol

      hope you can learn to loosen up a little Naiwen and be yourself

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        #4
        I know anxiety, but these days I just suck it up. I will always be this way and don't force myself to be someone I'm not. I have every right to be here and no one else is prettier or nicer: I can be someone's equal. I don't place others above me. OK, so I am only human but I don't apologize for being here and don't put others above me. I am not useless or less intelligent or less attractive. I have fairly high self esteem and get up when knocked down. I am 37 years old and find I like looking after myself. It is about being nice to myself, too. Because if I'm nice to myself, others will be nice to me and then I have nothing to fear. That's how I see it.

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          #5
          We have all heard a light-hearted joke made at the expense of a particularly shy, quiet and reclusive person. Someone will teasingly say, “She has antisocial personality disorder.” It is a common misconception that antisocial disorder is nothing more than an aversion to social situations or perhaps an extreme awkwardness in social settings, however, antisocial personality disorder is quite serious. A pattern of disruptive behavior can be apparent in a person as young as the age of 15, however, an individual cannot be clinically diagnosed with antisocial personality disorder until they are 18-years-old. If you suspect that a loved one is struggling with this disorder, there are a few things you can do to help him or her cope.
          Those who have an antisocial personality are characterized as having an extreme disregard for people’s rights and are known to violate the rights of others on a regular basis. This behavior is illustrated with a multitude of very serious symptoms, including a lack of remorse, irritability and aggressiveness, failure to conform to social norms, deceitfulness, reckless disregard, impulsivity and constant irresponsibility.
          Irritability and aggressiveness is often shown by repeated physical/verbal fights or assaults. Some of the symptoms of antisocial disorder may seem like personality quirks or typical attributes of teenage rebellion, for example, the failure to conform to social norms. As an observer, you must be astute enough to tell the difference between a young adult acting out as young people often do and a young adult repeatedly performing acts that are grounds for arrest - which shows an inability to conform to social norms. Deceitfulness may be one of the more hurtful aspects of antisocial personality disorder for the friends and family members of the diagnosed; this trait is illustrated by repeatedly lying or manipulating loved ones for personal gain or pleasure.
          Many of the symptoms can become dangerous not only for the person afflicted with the personality disorder, but also for those close to the individual. When an individual begins showing reckless disregard for their own safety and for the safety of those around them, it can become very worrisome and dangerous, especially when coupled with impulsivity. Another symptom, constant irresponsibility, may seem like another one of those traits that can easily be dismissed as a quality shared by many people, especially college-aged individuals, but friends and family may begin to feel the weight of the symptoms themselves. When loved ones have to constantly pick up the slack for their friend or family member by honoring their financial obligations or making excuses to their employers for them as to why they fail to sustain consistent work behavior, it’s time to take notice and take action.
          It may come as no surprise that those who have the traits of an antisocial personality do not seek treatment on their own. If you are concerned about a loved one and you feel they have all the symptoms of antisocial personality disorder, it is advised that you urge them to seek treatment. Some professionals even suggest giving the individual a list of consequences that you will adhere to if they do not seek treatment, much like those giving an intervention for a person who is addicted to drugs or alcohol are advised to do. An intervention is a smart move to make during the initial stages of attempting to help your loved one. They often do not work, but in the rare circumstance that an intervention does work, it can prove to be very beneficial. If a person does not willingly go into treatment for antisocial personality disorder, the next step is having treatment court mandated, which can be a long and arduous process that causes the family to lose precious time that could otherwise be used to help their loved one in need.

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            #6
            Hey Naiwen,

            Most of the people are suffering from social anxiety, and it happens to all once in life when they overthink or suffered from any fear. You shouldn't be scared of anyone. You cannot judge anyone without talking to anyone. So, try to communicate and control your fear. Don't show your fear to anyone.

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              #7
              I agree with Kristen Swan: never show your fear to anyone. This is deep, but worth considering [especially in my life!].

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