How Many Women Can Squirt: Fascinating (And Most Recent) Statistics To Know

41.4% of American women reported squirting at some point and among those, two-thirds said that the first time was by accident.
split screen image with a donut graph on the left depicting that among american women aged 18 to 93, 41.4% reported having squirted at some point during their lifetime, with a playful photograph of a woman wearing a swimsuit while holding a pool toy in one hand while blowing across the barrel of a squirt gun, squirting concept
Updated:February 2024

Among adult women in the United States, 41.4% have reported squirting at some point during their lifetime — of those, ⅔ did it by accident the first time it happened.

Key Statistics To Know:

  • 41.4% of adult American women between the ages of 18 and 93 have squirted at some point during their lifetime. [2]
  • 53.4% of women who reported squirting said they experienced female ejaculation through masturbation, 48.1% experienced it through intercourse, and 19.4% experienced it through anal stimulation; some women can squirt from more than one type of stimulation. [3]
  • About ⅔ of American women between the ages of 18 and 93 reported that they discovered squirting by accident. [2]
  • The median age of a woman’s first squirting experience is 24 years old. [2]
  • Among American women who reported squirting in the past, 41.8% were afraid they were peeing. [2]
  • 78.8% of women who squirt feel it enriches their sex lives and 90% of their partners (which include men and women) have a positive attitude about female ejaculation. [3]
  • Although squirting is rarely documented in men, one case was scientifically analyzed as “the first recording of male squirting using color Doppler ultrasonography” in 2018, and found to be 100% urine. [4]

In this article, we’ll share data and statistics about the number of women who squirt, how they do it, if they enjoy the activity (and what their partners think about it), as well as whether men are capable of squirting.

What Percentage Of Women Squirt?

donut graph depicting that among american women aged 18 to 93, 41.4% reported having squirted at some point during their lifetime
  • Although the “pathophysiology of squirting is rarely documented,” across various studies, 10 to 54% of women report having experienced squirting or female ejaculation. [1]
  • One 2023 study found that 41.4% of adult American women between the ages of 18 and 93 reported having squirted at some point during their lifetime; the median frequency was three to five times. [2]
  • Among American women between the ages of 18 and 93 who reported squirting, 39.6% did so “once or twice,” 19.5% did so 3-5 times, 11.7% reported doing it 6-10 times, and 28.9% did it 11 or more times. [2]
  • Among American women between the ages of 18 and 93 who reported squirting, 19.8% said they “always” experienced squirting and orgasm together, while 28.1% reported experiencing it “often.” [2]
  • Among American women between the ages of 18 and 93 who reported squirting, 17.2% report “never” experiencing squirting and orgasm together at the same time. [2]
  • The median age of a woman’s first squirting experience was 24 years old. [2]

Despite both public and scientific debates about whether squirting even exists, women who have squirted emphatically say YES!

This population is much larger than urban legends may lead us to believe, and it’s not simply limited to an (often-faked!) porn trick.

Importantly, squirting is physiologically distinct from orgasm, and while these experiences may align for some women, it is not necessary to squirt and orgasm simultaneously to enjoy the sensation.

How Do Women Squirt?

bar graph depicting that among women who reported squirting, 53.4% reported doing so through masturbation, 48.1% reported doing so through sexual intercourse, and 19.4% report doing so through anal stimulation
  • Some women can squirt as a result of more than one type of stimulation. 53.4% of women who reported squirting said they experienced female ejaculation through masturbation, 48.1% experienced it through intercourse, and 19.4% experienced it through anal stimulation (such as anal sex). [3]
  • About ⅔ of American women between the ages of 18 and 93 reported that they discovered squirting by accident — 51.6% said it happened with a partner and 13.8% said it occurred while exploring alone. [2]
  • 75.6% of women reported ever using specific techniques to promote buildup and/or release of squirting. [2]
  • Among women who reported using specific techniques to achieve squirting (and could select more than one option): [2]
    • 21.4% released tensed or clenched muscles
    • 19.6% used a harder or more intense touch
    • 17.1% used a burst of speed or pressure
    • 16.5% used pressure inside the vaginal wall
    • 15.6% used clitoral stimulation alone
    • 12.5% used outside and inside pressure concurrently
  • 40.2% of women reported using no specific technique when releasing squirt and 16.9% said they didn’t know or didn’t remember. [2]

When squirting occurs, it is typically accompanied by high levels of arousal and stimulation of the “G-spot.”

Traditional advice includes using a “come hither” motion against the G-spot, though women clearly use other techniques as well, especially in building up to squirting.

(This is just one reason sex research is important — because women can learn from each other!)

Do Women Enjoy Squirting?

bar graph depicting that among american women who reported squirting, 33.9% said it is very pleasurable, 25% said it is somewhat pleasurable, and 26.9% said it was a little pleasurable
  • 33.9% of American women who reported squirting said that it is “very pleasurable,” 25% said that it was “somewhat pleasurable,” and 26.9% said it was “a little pleasurable.” [2]
  • Among American women who reported squirting, 14.1% said that it was “not pleasurable.” [2]
  • Among American women who reported squirting in the past, 41.8% said “I was scared that I was peeing.” [2]
  • Among American women who reported squirting in the past, 28.3% said “I was worried I’d make a mess,” and 16.6% were afraid of losing control. [2]
  • One study that looked at the impact of female ejaculation on women’s sex lives found that 10.3% of women were indifferent about it but 7.2% said they sometimes wished they “would not ejaculate,” while 3.1% would prefer not to ejaculate at all [3]

Squirting is often assumed to be highly pleasurable, but women’s experiences vary.

Most women enjoy squirting to some degree.

However, numerous concerns can interfere with the pleasure of squirting, such as worries about peeing or accidentally ruining a new couch.

Sexuality is as much a mental and emotional experience as it is physical — fears and anxieties can compromise our pleasure in many different ways.

Do Men Like Squirt?

donut graph depicting that among sexual partners of women who squirt, 90% reported having a positive attitude toward female ejaculation
  • One study found that 78.8% of women felt that squirting “enriched” their sex lives — and 90% of their partners (which included men and women) had a positive attitude toward female ejaculation. [3]
  • 5% of squirting women reported their partner being indifferent about their squirting, and only 0.6% had a negative attitude toward it. [3]

The vast majority of women’s partners enjoy squirting.

Most people like seeing their partner enjoy themselves, and squirting in particular may be seen as positive because it provides physical “evidence,” so to speak, of a woman’s pleasure.

Can Men Squirt?

text graphic titled are men capable of squirting, which reads: male squirting is rarely documented, although one 2018 case study made the first recording of the phenomena using color doppler ultrasonography
  • Although squirting is rarely documented in men, one case was scientifically analyzed as “the first recording of male squirting using color Doppler ultrasonography” in 2018, which found that “[male squirting] is a phenomenon in which urine in the bladder gushes out from the external urethral orifice due to strong contraction of prostate and pelvic striated muscles, if penile stimulation is continued after ejaculation. These results provide the first scientific basis for a publicly known phenomenon.” [4]

Whether this phenomenon can occur in all men or it is a more rare occurrence, researchers currently do not know.

Importantly, however, “male squirting” is different from female squirting.

Female ejaculate is documented to be biologically distinct from urine, but in this case, “male squirting” is 100% urine.

Regardless, if it feels good, enjoy!

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