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The HPV Vaccine: Should You Vaccinate Your Kids Or Not?

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  • Kayla Lords
    replied
    When my kids' pediatrician told me they were eligible (based on age) for the HPV vaccine, I had them both vaccinated - to me, it's no different than getting them any of their other vaccinations and boosters (including for COVID). Our insurance covered it (thankfully) which just makes sense because it's a potential life and cost-savings against cancer later but clearly, in the US, not all insurers handle that way (which is ridiculous).

    I can't predict what will happen, and nothing is 100% foolproof but I agree with a previous commenter who said vaccinations are like insurance. If my kids are vaccinated and still get sick, at least I know I did what I could. But if I don't take advantage of available vaccines and they get those illnesses or diseases, I would always wonder if my decision was the reason for it - that's not a question I want to have to answer or live with. So...vaccines for both of them, based on pediatrician recommendations.

    That being said, I'm very fortunate that both kids aren't immuno-compromised or unable to be vaccinated for other health reasons, and I know that's not always true for other families.

    Leave a comment:


  • Rudhra
    replied
    The article is good. While the HPV vaccine is still controversial, the fact remains that HPV is the most common STD in the United States, and it is leading cause of cervical cancer. Currently, the vaccines only protect against four out of the more than 40 HPV strains that lead to cancer. That said, the vaccine has been shown to reduce the chances of developing HPV by as much as 90 percent. So the value of the vaccine does depend, at least in part, on the prevalence of HPV within a given population.

    Leave a comment:


  • atskitty2
    replied
    amy40 If you've ever had a Pap test, they possibly tested for HPV at that time. It is sometimes included in the battery of tests done with a standard pap. My gynecologists office does, but my friends does not, so...you may not know if you haven't asked specifically.

    I'm with you on unnecessary vaccines for preventable diseases. The fact is though, that your child may continue to choose not to have sex, or they may choose to have sex without your knowledge at some point prior to marriage. I think it's great to let them choose tho'. Have you considered an even more open conversation with him/her about getting the vaccine if they decide to have sex prior to 18, and without your knowledge? At least presented that option to them, and reminded them of the availability?

    And, if your child abstains until marriage, doesn't mean the partner would have, and there's risk of exposure there eventually as well. Just something to think about.

    Leave a comment:


  • amy40
    replied
    duplicate

    Leave a comment:


  • amy40
    replied
    know several people who have had breast cancer
    two of my neighbors died from it in the last 5 years

    however, I have never known anyone to have gotten cancer from HPV
    no relative, no neighbor, no friend

    once read a research article about HPV & cancer
    if remember correctly, the greatest risk was for those with multiple partners

    Leave a comment:


  • jns
    replied
    Originally posted by amy40 View Post

    you got the HPV vaccine?
    not about $, our child had 4 vaccines in last few months! that's enough

    who gets tested for HPV?
    I've never been tested for HPV & why would I?
    my vagina has only seen husband's penis

    we're teaching child that sex is for marriage & child agrees so why need for vaccine
    When I was a teenager we were taught that sex was for marriage. It turned out that most teenagers in my age group did not believe that enough to wait until marriage. Some were lucky. Some had kids out of wedlock. Some had bad relationships. Some died. What you are teaching your child now is a guideline but there is a chance or even a good chance that your child will go against your advice at some point in the future. Even in her late 80s, my mother is still learning of some of the things we did as kids.

    HPV vaccination is like insurance. Insurance has a cost, but it also has a benefit. The benefit becomes useful in bad times. It is not usable during the good times. The statistics are that 80 percent of sexually active adults have HPV at one time during their lifetime. Most throw it off. But some of those who don't throw it off end up with cancer.

    From the CDC: "HPV vaccination is not recommended for everyone older than age 26 years. However, some adults age 27 through 45 years who were not already vaccinated may decide to get HPV vaccine after speaking with their doctor about their risk for new HPV infections and the possible benefits of vaccination. HPV vaccination in this age range provides less benefit, as more people have already been exposed to HPV."

    By the time the HPV vaccine was available, I was already at the upper limit of getting vaccinated and was already married for 15 years. If the vaccine had been available twenty years before that, I would have definitely got vaccinated.

    Leave a comment:


  • amy40
    replied
    Originally posted by jns View Post
    Once vaccinated, the need for testing for HPV goes down. I have never regretted getting vaccinated against various diseases and I'm glad my parents had me vaccinated.
    jns ...you got the HPV vaccine?

    who gets tested for HPV?
    I've never been tested for HPV
    my vagina has ONLY seen husband's penis

    we're teaching child that sex is for marriage & child agrees so why need for vaccine?

    I'm against it especially since there are many stories/bad reactions to that vaccine

    Leave a comment:


  • jns
    replied
    Originally posted by amy40 View Post
    HPV can be given up to age 26 now, at least that's what I read

    our child had to have 2 vaccines for upcoming school year plus made the eligibility for covid shot, making 4 vaccines in a short amount of time

    so passing on HPV for now & probably leave it up to child to decide when they're 18
    If I were you and I could find a way to pay for it, I would get your child vaccinated against HPV. Once vaccinated, the need for testing for HPV goes down. I have never regretted getting vaccinated against various diseases and I'm glad my parents had me vaccinated. If anybody is going to put ideas in a child's head, it should be the parents. Don't cede that territory to someone you don't know.

    Leave a comment:


  • amy40
    replied
    HPV can be given up to age 26 now, at least that's what I read

    our child had to have 2 vaccines for upcoming school year plus made the eligibility for covid shot, making 4 vaccines in a short amount of time

    so passing on HPV for now & probably leave it up to child to decide when they're 18

    Leave a comment:


  • Alison H.
    replied
    Originally posted by jns View Post

    Insurance companies sometimes look at their bottom line to decide on what to cover and what not to cover. I hope all would cover such vaccines but I wouldn't bet on it because what I have read about them not covering reasonable health related things in the past. So cost could be a factor even for some of those who have health insurance.
    Oh, I absolutely agree. You would *think* that in the longterm, it would behoove insurance companies to cover something that prevents future cancers (and future medical costs). But there are many things they don't cover, and I'm sure the HPV vaccine is one, at least for some insurancie companies/policies.

    Leave a comment:

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