How Effective Is Birth Control If My Partner Cums Inside Me?

No birth control method is 100% effective, so the risk of unintended pregnancy if your partner cums inside you depends on several factors.
Photograph Of Various Contraceptives Including Birth Control Pills, Condoms, IUD, Vaginal Ring, And Morning After Pills Against A Blue Background
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Updated:February 2024

While birth control is never 100% effective, some types are better than others at preventing pregnancy if your partner cums inside you – whether intentionally or accidentally.

Here’s what you need to know about birth control effectiveness if your partner finishes inside you:

  • You can get pregnant even if you are on birth control. In addition, NO birth control is 100% effective.
  • You are more likely to get pregnant if your partner ejaculates inside you, however, pre-ejaculate (precum) can contain live sperm that could lead to pregnancy.
  • Long-lasting birth control methods like the implant and the intrauterine device (IUD) are the most effective (over 99%) because they remain in place, reducing the risks associated with imperfect use — such as forgetting to take a daily pill, for instance.
  • Birth control methods like the pill (99%), the shot (99%), and condoms (98%) are more effective when used exactly as instructed. However, due to inconsistent or late use, their average efficacy is only 93%, 96%, and 87%, respectively.
  • Combining birth control methods (such as using a condom while also taking the pill) can reduce the risk of pregnancy even if your partner cums inside you.
  • When you begin or end a particular method of birth control also plays a role in your risk for unintended pregnancy.

There are many ways to avoid pregnancy, including birth control, condoms, spermicide, the pull-out method, and tracking your ovulation cycle.

Some people use various combinations of these birth control methods, while others proceed with a wish and a prayer.

While we don’t recommend taking a “fingers-crossed” approach to pregnancy prevention, we do understand that sometimes you just want your partner to cum inside you when the going gets good – or it might happen accidentally (if a condom breaks for example).

So, assuming your partner is male-identifying, can he finish inside if you’re on birth control?

The short answer is maybe – as it depends on a lot of factors.

Things To Know

Is Birth Control Effective?

Birth control is generally effective when used as instructed, though no single method is a complete deterrent to pregnancy.

Studies have shown that 5% of unplanned pregnancies result from contraception that was used correctly (and failed) while 43% of unplanned pregnancies are a result of contraception that is used “inconsistently or incorrectly.”

For this reason, it’s important to make sure that the birth control method you choose is utilized correctly if you intend to let your partner finish inside.

How Effective Is Birth Control If He Cums Inside You?

Birth control is, statistically speaking, 95% effective if he cums inside — as long as the method is applied correctly each and every time you have sex. 

According to the study we referenced above, 61% of women who relied on condoms said they were not used during every instance of intercourse (or one was put over the penis “late” into the activity).

Additionally, 38% of women said they’d missed at least one birth control pill over a three-month period — which can and does affect the method’s efficacy.

As we mentioned earlier, when contraceptives were used correctly, their failure rate is only 5% overall (but varies considerably by method, more below).

Birth control can prevent pregnancy even if your partner cums inside you although the effectiveness ultimately depends on the exact method(s) you’re using and whether it is being used consistently and correctly.

Effectiveness Of Different Birth Control Types

Different birth control methods vary in their level of effectiveness and we’ll take a close look at each one below.

The Pill (Oral Contraceptives)

The combined pill is 99% effective when used perfectly while the progestogen-only pill is more than 99% effective.

But because many women occasionally miss taking their daily pill or take it at a different time during the day at some point, this birth control method is really only about 93% effective.

According to this study, between 3 and 7% of women on the pill become pregnant each year.

Additionally, the pill may also be less effective when taking certain antibiotics or other medications, or if you have vomiting or diarrhea for more than two days.

For these reasons, it can be helpful to use a backup birth control method even if you are on the pill.

But if you’re wondering, “Can he come in me if I’m on the pill?” the answer is generally yes — as long as you take it at the same time, each and every day, without fail.

When The Pill Starts (And Stops) Working

It is important to note that some medications and antibiotics (such as rifampin) can affect the pill’s efficacy. If you find yourself in this situation, make sure to employ a “backup” method such as condoms while taking such medications.

Birth control pills will become ineffective as soon as you stop using them and you’ll begin ovulating again within a few weeks.

The Birth Control Shot (Depo-Provera)

The shot is over 99% effective if you get it on time, meaning every three months.

In reality, the shot is about 96% effective because many people do not get their shots on time — about 6 out of every 100 women on Depo-Provera become pregnant each year.

When The Shot Starts (And Stops) Working

The shot is effective immediately if you get your first one within the first seven days after your period begins. If you get your first shot at any other time, it is effective after seven days.

The shot continues to work for 12-14 weeks after your last shot, though it may take you up to 10 months to get pregnant.

The Birth Control Implant (Nexplanon)

Also known as an etonogestrel subdermal implant, this nifty in-arm device is over 99% effective and one study found it to be 100% effective — in part because there is no room for user error.

Once placed, the implant remains intact, providing continual (and uninterrupted) distribution of hormonal therapy that prevents pregnancy for five years at a time.

When The Implant Starts (And Stops) Working

The implant is effective right away if you start it during the first five days of your period, or after seven days if you get it at any other time.

The implant stops working as soon as you get it removed.

The Intrauterine Device (IUD)

IUDs are also over 99% effective, resulting in fewer than 1 pregnancy per 100 women each year.

Like the implant, there is no room for mistakes when it comes to IUDs because they are inserted by a doctor and remain in place for 3 to 12 years, depending on the type.

When The IUD Starts (And Stops) Working

As soon as you get your IUD removed, it no longer protects you from pregnancy and you can get pregnant right away.

Vaginal Ring

Vaginal Rings (like NuvaRing, EluRyng, and Annovera) are between 91 and 99% effective depending on whether they’re being used correctly.

Inserted manually and worn for three weeks on, and one week off, they deliver hormones for varied lengths.

Both NuvaRing and EluRyng provide hormones for five weeks, while Annovera can deliver hormones for up to one year.

When The Ring Starts (And Stops) Working

If inserted on the first day of your menstrual period, its effect is immediate. When inserted on days two through five, however, it can take up to 7 days to reach full effectiveness.

Regular ovulation will begin when the ring is removed, however, it may take up to a few months for your cycle to become regular.

Diaphragm (Cervical Cap)

If a diaphragm is inserted correctly with the use of spermicide, it is between 92 and 96% effective at preventing pregnancy.

This method of birth control should be used before sexual activity, however, it is important to note that if a diaphragm is left in for longer than 3 hours, more spermicide should be applied.

When A Diaphragm Starts (And Stops) Working

If inserted correctly (with the use of spermicide), a diaphragm is effective immediately.

A diaphragm stops being effective when removed, and becomes less effective if worn for longer than 3 hours without additional spermicide being applied.

Condoms

Condoms are 98% effective at preventing pregnancy when used perfectly.

Realistically speaking, however, condoms are about 87% effective because they can slide off, break, or be forgotten entirely.

Additionally, 61% of women in one study noted that they either did not use a condom each and every time they had sex, or the condom was applied “late” into the activity.

It’s worth noting that the same study found that 43% of unplanned pregnancies resulted from contraception methods that were used incorrectly or inconsistently.

When Condoms Start (And Stop) Working

Condoms, of course, are effective as soon as your partner puts one on.

Condoms are ineffective any time your partner is not wearing one, is wearing one incorrectly, or if one is not put on before the penis comes into contact with the vulva or vagina during sex play.

Contraceptive Sponge

The failure rate for the contraceptive sponge is 17.4%, meaning that out of every 100 women who use this method, about 17 will become pregnant when using the sponge.

The contraceptive sponge contains spermicide and is designed to be worn for up to 24 hours at a time, and has to be inserted before penis-in-vagina sex.

When The Sponge Starts (And Stops) Working

The contraceptive sponge begins working immediately and lasts for up to 24 hours — but it should remain in place for at least 6 hours after sex.

The contraceptive sponge stops working after 24 hours or once removed.

Spermicide

Studies have shown that the failure rate of spermicides can range from between 3.8% and as high as 29%, with the average rate of pregnancy over a 6-month period being about 12% (12 out of every 100 users).

According to Mayo Clinic, about 21 out of every 100 women will become pregnant within the first year when spermicides are used alone, although that number is reduced when a secondary barrier is in place (such as a condom or diaphragm.

When Spermicides Start (And Stop) Working

Spermicides begin working within 10 to 15 after being applied vaginally, however, they only remain effective for about 60 minutes.

After 60 minutes, spermicides begin losing their effectiveness and should be reapplied if sexual activity continues beyond that point.

The Rhythm Method

Also known as “natural family planning”, the rhythm method relies on tracking your ovulation cycle each month to gauge when it is “safest” to have sex while avoiding pregnancy.

It is only 75% effective when done accurately.

When The Rhythm Method Starts (And Stops) Working

Because this birth control method relies on tracking ovulation, it starts working if you avoid having sex during the days when you’re most fertile — before, during, and after ovulation.

The rhythm method stops working when you stop tracking (or lose track of) your normal ovulation cycle, or if your cycle becomes irregular.

Emergency Contraception (Morning-After Pill)

Emergency contraception (the morning-after pill) is up to 90% effective at preventing pregnancy when taken correctly.

When Emergency Contraceptives Start (And Stop) Working

Emergency contraception (the morning-after pill) begins working immediately but is only effective if taken within 120 hours (no longer than 3 to 5 days, depending on the brand and type) after having unprotected sex.

Effectiveness Of Birth Control By Timing Or Situation

Different situations can affect how and when your birth control works, such as what phase of your menstrual cycle you are in when you start taking it or if you recently stopped taking it.

The list below outlines a few of these scenarios.

  • Vaginal ring:
    • Starts Working: If inserted on the first day of your menstrual period, its effect is immediate. When inserted on days two through five, however, it can take up to 7 days to reach full effectiveness.
    • Stops Working: Regular ovulation will begin when the ring is removed, however, it may take up to a few months for your cycle to become regular.
  • Diaphragm:
    • Starts Working: Effective immediately if inserted correctly and used with spermicide.
    • Stops Working: When removed, and becomes less effective if worn for longer than 3 hours without additional spermicide being applied.
  • Condoms:
    • Starts Working: As soon as your partner puts one on.
    • Stops Working: Any time your partner is not wearing one, is wearing one incorrectly, or if one is not put on before the penis comes into contact with the vulva or vagina during sex play.
  • Contraceptive sponge:
    • Starts Working: Immediately and lasts for up to 24 hours — but it should remain in place for at least 6 hours after sex.
    • Stops Working: After 24 hours or when removed.
  • Emergency contraceptives:
    • Starts Working: Immediately but is only effective if taken within 120 hours (no longer than 3 to 5 days, depending on the brand and type) after having unprotected sex.
    • Does Not Work: If taken beyond the “safe” window of time outlined on the brand of morning-after pill you’re using (3 to 5 days after unprotected sex).

Post-Sex Cleanup

After-sex cleanup may not be a popular topic, but it bears mentioning here.

Cleaning up after sex can help you maintain good hygiene and avoid infections, but it does not prevent pregnancy or STIs if you let your partner cum inside you.

The same holds true for post-sex cleanup products like Dripstick, an insertable sponge designed to soak up semen from the vaginal canal.

Our testers tried it themselves and found it to be effective at cleaning up cum — but that’s all. It will not prevent pregnancy.

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FAQs About Cumming Inside On Birth Control

You may still have questions about the risk of pregnancy if you’re on birth control and your partner cums inside, and that’s okay!

Below, we’ll provide information that will hopefully address your concerns.

Additionally, feel free to post your questions to the Women’s Health Interactive Forums — which are full of helpful people (including our own team) who can provide insight.

Can I Get Pregnant While On Birth Control?

Yes, you can get pregnant while you are on birth control.

The average person does not use birth control perfectly (e.g. taking the pill every day at the same time each day), and even if you do, there is always some risk of pregnancy.

Can I Get Pregnant Even If My Partner Doesn’t Cum Inside Me?

Although pre-ejaculate (also known as precum) may contain live sperm, most people get pregnant by ejaculation during penis-vagina intercourse.

You can still get pregnant from precum during intercourse or if your partner ejaculates near your vaginal opening or while they are pulling out.

This is possible because intrepid sperm can travel all the way from your vaginal opening up to your fallopian tubes to meet an egg.

How Long Do I Have To Use Emergency Contraception?

There are two methods of emergency contraception: the “morning after” or “Plan B” pill (such as Levonelle or ellaOne), which are designed to stop ovulation, and the IUD.

Does Plan B work if you ejaculate inside the vagina?

Yes, but only if you act quickly.

You must take Levonelle within three days of having sex and ellaOne within five days to prevent pregnancy.

The earlier you take it, the better.

Likewise, the IUD has a 99% chance of preventing pregnancy if you get it inserted within five days after having sex.

How Do I Know If I’m Pregnant?

The most common signs that you are pregnant are a missed period (assuming you typically get your period), tender and swollen breasts, nausea and/or vomiting, more frequent urination, and fatigue.

If you think you may be pregnant, you should take an at-home pregnancy test or consult a medical professional.

It’s worth noting that a missed period isn’t necessarily indicative of pregnancy.

There are many reasons why your period might be late — even with a negative pregnancy test.

In Conclusion

While it pays to be cautious, sex should be fun and pleasurable — not stressful.

Researching and obtaining birth control ahead of time can help you prevent unintended pregnancy and allow you to live in the moment with your partner, whether they cum inside you or not.

It’s important to make sure that you’re using your birth control method(s) of choice consistently — and correctly — if you intend to allow your partner to ejaculate inside and avoid pregnancy at the same time.

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